BLAST FROM THE PAST - Church dedication set

MARCH 12, 1933 The top stories in the Norwalk Reflector-Herald on this date 74 years ago:
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 24, 2010

MARCH 12, 1933

The top stories in the Norwalk Reflector-Herald on this date 74 years ago:

Townsend M.E. Church will be dedicated Sunday

Tomorrow morning, the new Methodist Church at Townsend will be dedicated with due ceremony by the Rt. Rev. H. Lester Smith of Cincinnati, a bishop of the M.E. Church. Tomorrow evening the memorial organ will be dedicated. Other dedication week meetings will be held later.

Next Wednesday evening will be church night. Dean Graham of Oberlin College is to speak and St. Paul's Episcopal choir of Norwalk will sing. The memorial dedication ceremony will take place Sunday morning, march 19.

Two fined at Bellevue taken to county jail

Al Stockmaster and Carl Springer, both of Bellevue, were brought to county jail Mar. 10, from that city. After being fined $10 and costs of $16.20 in all each, they were unable to pay. The arrest was made by Nickel Plate Railway detectives.

Buy American Club to be formed here

A Norwalk "Buy American Club," which will be a branch of the Ohio Buy American Club, with headquarters at 1621 Superior Ave. in Cleveland, is to be opened here.

The Buy American movement is sweeping the country from coast to coast and Norwalk is among the first towns in the state to show its loyalty and patriotism by joining the movement and perfecting a local organization.

The Buy American movement is in no way to be considered a boycott. It is merely an education campaign to show the American people the folly of buying foreign good when they can purchase American made goods of far better value in proportion to the dollar spent.

The leading citizens of Norwalk are already showing a lot of enthusiasm towards this movement and are pledging their local support to the organization of a local Buy American Club. Thursday evening the Norwalk Kiwanis Club endorsed the move.

Pledge cards will be passed out to every citizen in the town and everyone will be given an opportunity to buy American made goods whenever possible.

Kist is made defendant in important suit

Alfred A. Kist, who has been made a defendant in a law suit at Portland, Ore., involving the control of a successful newspaper concern of that city, will be vividly remembered by many here as a central figure in a striking episode that developed here back in 1917.

At that time, Charles Shively was proprietor of a weekly newspaper here and Kist was in the city to conduct a trade-at-home publicity project through newspapers. After Shively printed an item that offended Kist, the two men met in the downtown district of the city. How Shively was made the victim of a most distressing style of attack that was not without a factor of humor, became not only the talk of the town, but the subject t of discussion and laughter over a much wider area.

Compiled by Andy Prutsok