Children Services administrator retiring

The administrator of children services for the county announced this morning he plans to retire this fall. David Broehl, 60, has been with the Huron County Department of Job and Family Services (HCDJFS) since 2002. He said the decision to retire is based on his age and eligibility under the Ohio Public Employees Retirement System.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 24, 2010

 

The administrator of children services for the county announced this morning he plans to retire this fall.

David Broehl, 60, has been with the Huron County Department of Job and Family Services (HCDJFS) since 2002. He said the decision to retire is based on his age and eligibility under the Ohio Public Employees Retirement System.

Broehl said the high profile cases of Michael and Sharen Gravelle and Paul Efaw, and the ensuing public criticism, were not part of his decision making process. Nor, he said, was the pending review of the entire agency in fact Broehl said he welcomes the review, which he expects to be completed before he retires Sept. 7.

"This has been a very positive experience," he said of working in Huron County. "The thing I've enjoyed the most is the people. What you see is what you get, there are no faades. You're just getting really straightforward people."

Broehl, who lives in Wooster and admitted the daily 45-minute drive was wearing on him, is active in the community. He works with the United Fund, Firelands Historical Society and is the coach of the girls' soccer team at Norwalk High School a position he would like to retain next season.

Prior to joining HCDJFS, Broehl worked for Trumbull County from 1997 to 2002 and for 20 years in the private sector as a management consultant.

Working in children services can be "extremely difficult" at times.

"We have some families that are in trauma. We have some parents who are involved with drugs or alcohol. We have some parents with mental health issues. We have some families that are breaking apart," Broehl said. "From the outside looking in, we say 'Who's got the magic wand? Let's wave that wand and fix that family.' It's not that easy. We're dealing with the most difficult issues in society."

The harsh realities of children services can drive some workers out of the job after just a few years.

"I go to state meetings where we have 88 children services' administrators and I'm the oldest. I think that that's a signal to me," Broehl said. He added that Huron County has been fortunate and many of the 19 children services employees have been at the agency for a long time. "I think it is tough, it's a tough profession. Our employees are not paid a lot of money ... they are in it because they love the work."

However, even with all the challenges and criticisms, Broehl said the job also is rewarding. The best experience of his tenure was early on when the agency had six female siblings up for adoption. Children services wanted to keep the siblings together, which they thought would be difficult. Broehl said the county had 27 applications, eventually narrowed down to three families without any other children all of which would have been great.

"We did choose one family, and when that family was united that day, it really was one of the finest days of my life," he said, getting choked up. "It was spectacular. I get a little shaken up in a very positive way. That was really an incredible experience ... We deal with a lot of dysfunction and a lot of negatives, if we can get people to a good place in life, that's the positive."

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WhatWouldJesusD...

GRAVELLE FAMILY UPDATE #22

Some very interesting things are going on in Huron County. Eric Dumbeck was removed from his position on Feb. 24 as HCDJFS Director so he can concentrate on Children’s Services issues and a consultant was hired to do an independent investigation of the Job and Family Services.

On March 7, David Broehl, Administrator of Children's Services, announced that he is going to retire at age 60. I think the next head on the chopping block should be Jo Johnson but there was an article on the front page on March 6th about Sheriff Sutherland issuing a gag order to cover up criminal activity in his department so I guess it'll be a toss-up between those two.

The Sheriff, as well as Judge Cardwell, Judge McGimpsey, and Russ Leffler should have issued gag orders during the Gravelle case on themselves as well as their departments instead of having the private, confidential information of juveniles published on the front page of the newspaper for all the world to read and to taint the jury pool. The only people under a gag order were the Gravelles and their attorney so that people couldn't hear the truth and Elaine Thompson so that she couldn’t testify in favor of the Gravelles. Let's remember the Gravelle case when we go to the polls.

* * * * * * * *

A mouse looked through the crack in the wall to see the farmer and his wife open a package. “What food might this contain?" the mouse wondered. He was devastated to discover it was a mousetrap.

Retreating to the farmyard, the mouse proclaimed the warning, “There is a mousetrap in the house! There is a mousetrap in the house!”

The chicken clucked and scratched, raised her head and said, "Mr. Mouse, I can tell this is a grave concern to you, but it is of no consequence to me. I cannot be bothered by it."

The mouse turned to the pig and told him, "There is a mousetrap in the house! There is a mousetrap in the house!" The pig sympathized, but said, I am so very sorry, Mr. Mouse, but there is nothing I can do about it but pray. Be assured you are in my prayers."

The mouse turned to the cow and said "There is a mousetrap in the house! There is a mousetrap in the house!" The cow said, "Wow, Mr. Mouse. I'm sorry for you, but it's no skin off my nose."

So, the mouse returned to the house, head down and dejected, to face the farmer's mousetrap alone. That very night a sound was heard throughout the house --the sound of a mousetrap catching its prey.

The farmer's wife rushed to see what had been caught. In the darkness, she did not see it was a venomous snake whose tail was caught in the trap. The snake bit the farmer's wife. The farmer rushed her to the hospital and she returned home with a fever.
Everyone knows you treat a fever with fresh chicken soup, so the farmer took his hatchet to the farmyard for the soup's main ingredient.

But his wife's sickness continued, so friends and neighbors came to sit with her around the clock. To feed them, the farmer butchered the pig.

The farmer's wife did not get well. She died. So many people came for her funeral the farmer had the cow slaughtered to provide enough meat for all of them.

The mouse looked upon it all from his crack in the wall with great sadness.

So, the next time you hear that someone is facing a problem and think it doesn't concern you, remember - when one of us is threatened, we are all at risk. We are all involved in this journey called life. We must keep an eye out for one another and make an extra effort to encourage one another.

Remember – each of us is a vital thread in another person’s tapestry. Our lives are woven together for a reason.

Please help Michael and Sharen Gravelle in their fight against government and CPS injustice by sending a donation to the Gravelle Family Defense Fund, Key Bank, 11 West Main St., Wakeman, Ohio 44889.

For the Gravelle side of the story see www.kidjacked.com

REMEMBER - YOUR FAMILY COULD BE NEXT!!