All signs point to green

CLEVELAND As an annual source of inspiration and expert advice, the 64th annual National City Home & Garden Show dedicates 800,000 square feet to the latest home and garden trends and innovations Feb 3 to 11 at the I-X Center in Cleveland. For the first time in the show's history, the popular event will celebrate two complimentary themes: "The Beauty of Ireland" and "The Green Building Movement." This year's double theme invites visitors to rekindle their love for the famous Irish culture and its natural green beauty while exploring alternative methods for building and living green in the 21st century.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 24, 2010

CLEVELAND As an annual source of inspiration and expert advice, the 64th annual National City Home & Garden Show dedicates 800,000 square feet to the latest home and garden trends and innovations Feb 3 to 11 at the I-X Center in Cleveland.

For the first time in the show's history, the popular event will celebrate two complimentary themes: "The Beauty of Ireland" and "The Green Building Movement." This year's double theme invites visitors to rekindle their love for the famous Irish culture and its natural green beauty while exploring alternative methods for building and living green in the 21st century.

The country's rich and tragic past is written all over the Irish landscape. Grassy hills, jagged rock walls, purple heather and historic castles make for breathtaking scenery. The Emerald Isle is also a vibrant country on the frontlines of sustainability and green building. During its nine-day run, the Home & Garden Show will showcase Ireland's beauty and progression among its 30 garden features.

"Since day one, the Irish American Clubs of Cleveland's East and West side have played an important role in our planning efforts," show president Chris Fassnacht said. "The feedback and knowledge they shared with us about Ireland's history and culture allowed us to create a festive, authentic tribute that the local Irish community will surely appreciate and notice."

Increased consumer demand for green building methods is fueling the launch of green building programs all over the country as home buyers look for ways to make the home healthier and less expensive to maintain for its occupants and the environment. The shoe brings alternative ideas and green living concepts to the forefront and provide the green building movement is not a fad, but the future.

In addition to promoting all things green, the show teamed up with Rosby Resource Recycling in Brooklyn Heights, Ohio, to learn better ways to reuse show materials, divert waste from crowded landfills and maximize recycling efforts.

"Everything from basic trash to the carpeting used in the aisles will be thought about with a green mindset," Fassnacht said. "Going green has become more than just the theme of the 2007 Show. We want to be proactive in this arena and will continue to do so with future Shows and events."

With more than 900 home improvement vendors and garden exhibitors, the following highlight some of the attractions and features at this year's Home & Garden Show:

HOMES