NPD gets most calls on Fridays, Saturdays

cashby@norwalkreflector.com PULL-OUT BOX: Detective bureau drug investigations In 2007, police arrested 45 suspects on 102 counts of various drug offenses as a result of drug investigations conducted by the detective bureau (comprised of four officers).
Cary Ashby
Jul 25, 2010

cashby@norwalkreflector.com

PULL-OUT BOX:

Detective bureau drug investigations

In 2007, police arrested 45 suspects on 102 counts of various drug offenses as a result of drug investigations conducted by the detective bureau (comprised of four officers).

2007 2006

Heroin 52 41

Cocaine/crack cocaine 30 34

Marijuana 38 44

Prescription drugs 25 16

Other drug investigations/illegal drug sales 11 15

Deception to obtain dangerous drugs 7 n/a

Source: The 2007, 2006 Norwalk Police Department annual reports

Those of us working weekdays consider Wednesday "hump day," when we can see the downward slide to the end of the week. By Friday, we're ready to kick back and relax or rock-n-roll.

It's not too different for the Norwalk Police Department.

The annual report shows that officers received the least average amount of calls in the week, 44, on Wednesdays last year. Police get the most calls on Fridays and Saturdays, with about 52 each day.

The next highest call day is Monday, when the department receives an average of 48. Chief Kevin Cashen said there is a reason.

"We're dealing with stuff that happens over the weekend. Monday also is our court day," he said.

Norwalk Municipal Judge John Ridge oversees arraignments at 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Mondays.

Dispatchers' busiest time during the day to get calls was between 4 and 6 p.m. last year. There were usually three calls per hour during that time frame, compared to less than one between 6 and 8 a.m.

Cashen said the afternoon shift 2 to 10 p.m. typically accounts for 40 to 43 percent of the department's work load.

In 2007, police responded to 17,546 calls for service a nearly 18 percent increase from 2006, when there were 14,814. While Cashen noted in the annual report that the 2007 number is a new department record, he also wrote that the "computer-aided dispatch (system) has greatly enhanced our ability to capture this data."

The new software was installed in the fall of 2005. Since that time, Cashen said, the number of misdemeanor citations and arrests have been combined into one category and were categorized separately as of 2005.

There were 1,802 arrests last year, compared to 1,595 in 2006. In year-by-year data compiled by Cashen, there were 1,025 arrests and 514 misdemeanor citations in 2000.

"We made a substantial amount of warrant arrests," Cashen said about last year.

Police wrote 3,476 reports last year. The chief considers about 3,500 reports each year a fairly consistent number.

Of those total complaints in 2007, 3,176, or 91 percent, were "cleared." Cashen said that means officers "closed the case" by having the case presented to a grand jury, making an arrest, having their report reviewed by a law director or determining the complaint was unfounded.

"If a case is pending, there is something left to do," he said. "There are still some we can't do anything about."