Roasts & Toasts

Toast Jack Kuhlman of Monroeville, who is giving the gift of life to a friend and co-worker at CertainTeed in Avery. Kuhlman is donating a kidney later this week to Jim Kimberlin, of Bellevue. Kuhlman, 39, and Kimberlin, 42, met 11 years ago at work and became friends. After and industrial accident in 1994, Kimberlin discovered he suffered from a genetic kidney disease. Once a healthy kidney is transplanted, the recipient can live a normal, healthy life. A benefit fundraiser was held Saturday and was a huge success. It's great to see such an outpouring of support and we wish all the best to Kimberlin in his recovery. Roast the continued problems plaguing the Cuyahoga County Board of Elections. With the Ohio primary just seven weeks away, the county's new director, Jane Platten, has ordered a change in voting systems three weeks ago . With absentee voting starting in less than a month, time is not on Platten's side. In 2006, county voters first voted on touch-screen machines. The board had nearly a year to prepare, but the election still was a headache, with final results delayed nearly a week. The machines have been scrapped and on March 4, voters will fill out paper ballots with pens at nearly 600 polling places in the county. The ballots will be taken to the board's warehouse where they will be read by 15 optical scanners. Previously, votes have been counted at board of elections offices. While we applaud Platten's efforts, this is nothing but a step backwards as we try to move forward in the technology age.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 25, 2010

Toast Jack Kuhlman of Monroeville, who is giving the gift of life to a friend and co-worker at CertainTeed in Avery. Kuhlman is donating a kidney later this week to Jim Kimberlin, of Bellevue. Kuhlman, 39, and Kimberlin, 42, met 11 years ago at work and became friends. After and industrial accident in 1994, Kimberlin discovered he suffered from a genetic kidney disease. Once a healthy kidney is transplanted, the recipient can live a normal, healthy life. A benefit fundraiser was held Saturday and was a huge success. It's great to see such an outpouring of support and we wish all the best to Kimberlin in his recovery.

Roast the continued problems plaguing the Cuyahoga County Board of Elections. With the Ohio primary just seven weeks away, the county's new director, Jane Platten, has ordered a change in voting systems three weeks ago . With absentee voting starting in less than a month, time is not on Platten's side. In 2006, county voters first voted on touch-screen machines. The board had nearly a year to prepare, but the election still was a headache, with final results delayed nearly a week. The machines have been scrapped and on March 4, voters will fill out paper ballots with pens at nearly 600 polling places in the county. The ballots will be taken to the board's warehouse where they will be read by 15 optical scanners. Previously, votes have been counted at board of elections offices. While we applaud Platten's efforts, this is nothing but a step backwards as we try to move forward in the technology age.

Toast the efforts of the Wllard City Schools as they pursue money from the Ohio School Facilities Commission. There is money out there available for schools to build new facilities or upgrade what they already have. Just look around and you'll see the results: New schools at Western Reserve, South Central, New London and Plymouth. It takes a lot of work and support from the voters, but it's "free" money that somebody else will take if you don't.

Roast the ongoing writers strike that has dragged on for months and has all but brought Hollywood to a halt. Hollywood's first big awards show was over in a flash, with no key winners, no stars in sight and no real fun for fans of show business glitz. The Golden Globes on Sunday honored its winners. Yet no one film gained critical momentum that might set it ahead of the pack for the Academy Awards on Feb. 24, and a compressed Globes show highlighted what a joyless awards season this is for Hollywood. The two-month-old strike by the Writers Guild of America scuttled the big celebrity bash at the 65th annual Globes, which was replaced by a bizarre and speedy news conference to announce recipients, without any winners around to gush their thanks. To the writers, we say wake up. If you don't watch out, reality TV will take over and put all of you out of jobs.

Comments

Concerned Citiz...

What a Republican newspaper. Why can't we tell the fat cats the writers are striking against that THEY better watch out. Writers, I'm sure, earn a lot less and have a lot smaller houses than the "fat cats" do.