Clothing bank to benefit from silent auction

Attending a Browns or Cavaliers game normally is not a good deed. But if you end up attending the Dec. 30 Browns game, or the Dec. 17 or Jan. 2 Cavs game, you will have indirectly performed a good deed.
Aaron Krause
Jul 25, 2010

Attending a Browns or Cavaliers game normally is not a good deed.

But if you end up attending the Dec. 30 Browns game, or the Dec. 17 or  Jan. 2 Cavs game, you will have indirectly performed a good deed.

Browns and Cavaliers tickets for those games are just two of the items available in a silent auction to benefit the Clothing Bank in Norwalk.

The silent auction kicked off Monday, and runs through 6:15 p.m. Thursday. Those wishing to place silent bids can view the items at the Norwalk Area Chamber of Commerce office, 10 W. Main St.

Available objects include Browns tickets, Cavaliers tickets, Ohio State memorabilia, environmentally friendly cleaning supplies, a basket of Italian foods, a goodie bag from Fisher-Titus Medical Center and a stargazers basket.

 The clothing bank is a nonprofit organization run entirely by volunteers. Its mission is to provide clothing and household items to people in need.

 The organization does not charge for the merchandise; the operation is subsidized by the Norwalk Area United Fund and private donations.

“What the Clothing Bank does is absolutely amazing,” said Melissa James, executive director of the Norwalk Area Chamber of Commerce.  

Peg Baird, executive vice president of Fisher-Titus Medical Center, said she joined the clothing bank’s board last spring.

“I felt very committed to this organization because I think they do so much good,” Baird said.

She said she realized raising money was a challenge for the organization, so she brainstormed with others.

They came up with a silent auction.

Clothing Bank Manager Jean Row said the organization could use the money.

“It costs quite a bit to operate,” she said.

Specifically, Row said it costs about $21,000 a year. Row said she requested  $12,000 from the United Fund, but that will depend on whether the United Fund meets its goal this year.

Row said she feels the community needs the Clothing Bank. Last year, it serviced more than 8,000 clients, and there’s been a 15 to 20 percent increase this year.

Money raised from the silent auction will go toward basic expenses such as rent, utilities and trash.

“We have a lot of money wrapped up in our trash disposal,” Row said, emphasizing the word “lot.”

Baird said between recent cash donations and the silent auction, the goal is to raise at least a month or two’s worth of operating expenses — $1,700 for a month and $3,500 for two months.