AGRI-BUSINESS NEWS AND NOTES - It's election time again

Ballots for this year's county committee election were mailed to eligible voters on Nov. 2. Voters must complete their ballots and return them to the Farm Service Agency county office by the close of business on Dec. 3. If mailed, ballots must be postmarked by midnight Dec. 3.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 25, 2010

Ballots for this year's county committee election were mailed to eligible voters on Nov. 2.

Voters must complete their ballots and return them to the Farm Service Agency county office by the close of business on Dec. 3. If mailed, ballots must be postmarked by midnight Dec. 3.

The candidates in this year's election in Huron County are:

John A. Liles who lives in Townsend Township with his wife of 43 years Rosemary. The Liles are the parents of three adult children; Andy, Mary, and Eve who range in age from 35 to 41 years. Liles has been engaged in farming for the past 50 years. He raises corn, beans and wheat. He also raises steers for the families use. Liles has served on the Huron County Committee for six years, currently as chairman. He is a member of Farm Bureau, Farmers Union, and the Collins United Methodist Church where he serves as the chairman for the preschool. Liles also serves as a Townsend Township trustee and as a volunteer with the Red Cross Bloodmobile. Liles is a former 4-H adviser and former member of the Townsend Volunteer Fire Department.

Harold S. Dalton Jr., who resides in Wakeman Township with Melinda, his wife of 33 years. He has been involved in farming for the past 30 years. He currently operates their family farm with his son Edward. The Dalton's also have two daughters Rachel and Elizabeth. He raises corn, soybeans, wheat and hay. He also raises cattle, sheep and donkeys. Dalton is a member of the Farm Bureau, the Soybean Growers Association and the Corn Growers Association. He is also a member of the Wakeman United Church of Christ. Dalton has been a 4-H adviser for 15 years. He has also served as the superintendent of the 4-H sheep barn at the Huron County Fair for about 15 years.

Eligible voters living in LAA 2, which includes Bronson, Clarksfield, Hartland, Norwalk, Townsend and Wakeman townships in Huron County who have not received a ballot should contact their FSA county office staff. To be eligible to vote in this election producers must meet the following criteria:

1. Be of legal voting age and have an interest in a farm or ranch as either of the following: an owner, operator, tenant or sharecropper, or a partner in a general partnership or member of a joint venture that has an interest in a farm as an owner, operator, tenant or sharecropper; or

2. Not of legal voting age, but supervises and conducts the farming operations on an entire farm; and

3. Participates or cooperates in any FSA program that is provided by law.

Discrimination is prohibited in this election. No person shall be denied the right to vote because of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation or marital or family status.

Here are some agri-business notes from the Huron and Erie County Farm Service Agency:

Conservation programs Now is the time for farmers to look at their crop fields and determine which acres are unproductive. Whether this is a perimeter of a field, a tree canopy, for instance, or a wet area in the field. These areas may be eligible for an enrollment into a CRP conservation practice. For example, quail buffers, filter strips along ditches and streams or wetlands are available. Farmers should consider the economic benefits from 10- to 15-year enrollment in CRP. Annual payments are guaranteed for the length of the contract, where as crop yields and prices don't have those guarantees. Additionally, the conservation practices can benefit wildlife and improve water quality. Producers should visit their local FSA office to learn more details about conservation and the CRP program and where these practices will fit into the farm operation and landscape. And remember, this is available to all landowners in Ohio.

Unauthorized grain disposition If loan grain has been disposed of through feeding, selling or any other form of disposal without prior written authorization from the county office staff, it is considered unauthorized disposition. The financial penalties for unauthorized dispositions are severe and a producers name will be placed on a loan violation list for a two-year period. Always call the office before any grain under loan is fed or sold.

Diana Strouse is the county executive director for the Huron and Erie County Farm Service Agency. For more information, call the agency at (419) 668-4113.