God's Little Critters a great place

This letter is in regard to God's Little Critters Wildlife Rehabilitation Center in Willard. I first traveled to the center and met Maribeth Taylor in the summer of 2007 to evaluate a non-releasable red-tail hawk for possible program use within the education department at the Akron Zoo. I have been to several other rehab facilities and was pleasantly surprised when I arrived at God's Little Critters. Rather than housing the animals in close quarters in a hospital-like setting, the animals at Maribeth Taylor's facility are house in large, outdoor enclosures in a very natural environment. In addition, the housing enclosures are spread out over the property, allowing the animals some sense of privacy. I believe the set up of God's Little Critters is designed to eliminate as much stress as possible for the animals in its care, thereby leading to (hopefully) more speedy recoveries. Maribeth Taylor was also a pleasure to meet. She is friendly and knowledgeable, and though I sense she becomes emotionally invested with the animals in her care, she does not lose sight of her purpose and the laws she is to abide by. That emotional investment is what kept the Akron Zoo's newest member of the program animal collection alive long enough to truly have a second chance at life. Though that life will not be in the wild, it will have the purpose of creating awareness in people of the wildlife around them.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 25, 2010

 

This letter is in regard to God's Little Critters Wildlife Rehabilitation Center in Willard. I first traveled to the center and met Maribeth Taylor in the summer of 2007 to evaluate a non-releasable red-tail hawk for possible program use within the education department at the Akron Zoo.

I have been to several other rehab facilities and was pleasantly surprised when I arrived at God's Little Critters. Rather than housing the animals in close quarters in a hospital-like setting, the animals at Maribeth Taylor's facility are house in large, outdoor enclosures in a very natural environment.

In addition, the housing enclosures are spread out over the property, allowing the animals some sense of privacy. I believe the set up of God's Little Critters is designed to eliminate as much stress as possible for the animals in its care, thereby leading to (hopefully) more speedy recoveries.

Maribeth Taylor was also a pleasure to meet. She is friendly and knowledgeable, and though I sense she becomes emotionally invested with the animals in her care, she does not lose sight of her purpose and the laws she is to abide by. That emotional investment is what kept the Akron Zoo's newest member of the program animal collection alive long enough to truly have a second chance at life. Though that life will not be in the wild, it will have the purpose of creating awareness in people of the wildlife around them.

Debra Swank

Education Specialist

Akron Zoo