FBI gets Bellevue bomb threat information

BELLEVUE - Information related to Thursday's bomb threat that closed Bellevue City Schools has been forwarded to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). The FBI Cleveland division assisted local authorities after the FBI Toledo office received a call about the situation Thursday morning. Bellevue Police Chief Dennis Brandal said his department is in the midst of a joint investigation with the FBI and Sandusky Police Department.
Cary Ashby
Jul 25, 2010

 

BELLEVUE — Information related to Thursday’s bomb threat that closed Bellevue City Schools has been forwarded to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

The FBI Cleveland division assisted local authorities after the FBI Toledo office received a call about the situation Thursday morning. Bellevue Police Chief Dennis Brandal said his department is in the midst of a joint investigation with the FBI and Sandusky Police Department.

Bellevue schools closed in response to a reader who posted an online comment late Wednesday night on a Sandusky Register story. The writer told authorities to “be ready” Thursday for a bomb threat, also saying it wasn’t a “simulation.” The Register took down the message about 5:30 a.m. Thursday and called police.

Bomb-sniffing dogs from various area law enforcement agencies didn’t find anything during searches that encompassed every classroom in each school building.

Brandal said authorities are following various leads and trying to connect information to see if it’s related. He said there is “nothing concrete” that would lead to an arrest warrant.

Authorities currently don’t have a suspect and haven’t been able to find the name of person who wrote the comment.

“Apparently you can trace things internationally. We’re not at (that) point in the investigation,” Brandal said. “It has several jurisdictions involved.”

Bellevue City Schools has students in four counties: Erie, Huron, Sandusky and Seneca.

On Thursday, Superintendent Steven Schumm said he plans to pursue charges against the person responsible for the threat. He has called it an “in-depth investigation.”

Brandal declined to name a possible charge the suspect might face because of the various agencies involved. The chief said the situation is complicated because the message “appeared” in Sandusky for a story about Bellevue and went through international telecommunications via the Internet.

“A lot of police work has gone from pounding doors to pounding on keyboards,” Brandal said.