Beat the brown bag blues: Nutrition, fun can co-exist

"Nutrition" and "fun" do not have to be mutually exclusive terms. Mike Sieminski, a registered and licensed dietitian with the American Dairy Association Mideast the local affiliate for the National Dairy Council wants to help you make your child lunches they will enjoy eating and are good for them.
Aaron Krause
Jul 25, 2010

 

"Nutrition" and "fun" do not have to be mutually exclusive terms.

Mike Sieminski, a registered and licensed dietitian with the American Dairy Association Mideast the local affiliate for the National Dairy Council wants to help you make your child lunches they will enjoy eating and are good for them.

A lunch bag filled with the same types of foods day after day nutritious or not may very well lead to a case of the "Brown Bag Blues." Sieminski suggests you mix it up and involve your children in packing his lunch.

Let your child, for example, pick out a lunch box with a drawing of his favorite cartoon character. Then, when you're ready to prepare the meal, pick out a themed lunch such as stick-shaped foods; Sieminski suggested cutting a sandwich into four or five vertical strips, and include carrot sticks and string cheese.

For a cookie-themed sandwich, you might try cutting your child's sandwich and other foods you and your child pack with a cookie cutter.

Speaking of cookies and other sweet treats, Sieminski suggested following this rule: Never say never; if you deprive yourself of something you like, that could lead to cravings, stuffing yourself and gaining weight as a result.

Sieminski said pizza can be healthy in moderation: It contains cheese from the milk, yogurt and cheese group of the food pyramid; bread from the bread, cereal, rice and pasta group and tomato sauce, which falls under the fruit group.