OUR VIEW - Kudos to FTMC for keeping healthcare local

The good news just keeps on coming from Fisher-Titus Medical Center. Last week hospital officials broke ground for a new $11.3 million, 22,000 square foot addition for a heart and vascular center at FTMC, expected to open next summer.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 25, 2010

The good news just keeps on coming from Fisher-Titus Medical Center.

Last week hospital officials broke ground for a new $11.3 million, 22,000 square foot addition for a heart and vascular center at FTMC, expected to open next summer.

"They're going to come through one door and all of their cardiovascular needs will be met right here," said Suzanne Inglis, R.N., director of cardiovascular services for Fisher-Titus Medical Center.

The addition will allow local residents to get treatment for cardiovascular ailments here rather than be forced to travel to Cleveland, Toledo or other cities after diagnosis.

Getting sick and battling illnesses is tough enough without all of the worries of time and travel. This way, patients can focus all of their energy on getting better.

The hospital jumped into the new millennium with both feet when it opened its new $28 million patient pavilion in August 2005. At the time FTMC President Patrick J. Martin said the key was keeping healthcare local, and this is another step in that direction.

FTMC works closely with McGruder Hospital in Port Clinton, Fremont Hospital, Firelands Regional Medical Center and The Bellevue Hospital.

"We want to focus on what is right for this service area," Martin said at the time of the pavilion opening. "That's why we work together on things like mental health with Firelands. We want to keep healthcare local."

Martin and Inglis estimated that once the addition is opened next summer, at least 2,000 people a year will be able to receive cardiovascular treatment locally instead of traveling to other hospitals.

Lorna Strayer, FTMC's vice president of business development, said research and planning for the addition began in 2005. While researching the need for cardiovascular services, she said, the hospital realized that many patients with heart conditions were transferred to other hospitals.

That all will change. FTMC soon will be a one-stop shop and that is good for everybody in Huron County. The health of our community depends on the health of our people and right now the prognosis for both looks pretty good.