Heart disease serious threat to women

Only 13 percent of women view heart disease as a health threat, even though it's women's No. 1 killer, according to the American Heart Association. In fact, one in 2.6 female deaths are from cardiovascular disease, compared with one in 30 from breast cancer. "Cardiovascular disease (CVD) kills over 480,000 women a year, about one per minute," said Dr. Raj Karnik, a member of Fisher-Titus Medical Center's medical staff and a cardiologist with University of Toledo Physicians heart and vascular. "Women need to take charge of their health and be educated about this deadly disease."
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 25, 2010

 

Only 13 percent of women view heart disease as a health threat, even though it's women's No. 1 killer, according to the American Heart Association. In fact, one in 2.6 female deaths are from cardiovascular disease, compared with one in 30 from breast cancer.

"Cardiovascular disease (CVD) kills over 480,000 women a year, about one per minute," said Dr. Raj Karnik, a member of Fisher-Titus Medical Center's medical staff and a cardiologist with University of Toledo Physicians heart and vascular. "Women need to take charge of their health and be educated about this deadly disease."

Karnik will present "Women's No. 1 Health Concern: Heart Disease" at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 20 at Fisher-Titus Learning Center at Norwalk High School, 350 Shady Lane Drive, Norwalk. During the forum, Karnik will discuss heart disease and how it affects women in particular. The board-certified cardiologist also will provide information on risk factors and how women can take preventative measures to lower their risk for heart disease.

"For men and women, the most common heart attack symptom is chest pain or discomfort," Karnik said. "But it's also more likely in women than men to experience some of the other symptoms, particularly shortness of breath, nausea/vomiting, and back or jaw pain. It is important that women know the warning signs of a heart attack and act promptly if they have symptoms."

To register and for more information, call (419) 660-2828.