Historic Lyme Village's Pioneer Days this weekend

akrause@norwalkreflector.com BELLEVUE Historic Lyme Village's Pioneer Days allows people to experience life as it was in the 1800s and early 1900s. But, there is at least one demonstrator who will talk about a practice that has as much use today as in years past. At Pioneer Days this weekend, Rural North Fairfield resident Ken Featheringill will discuss the importance of bees and the products they make . "The public needs to be educated about our honey bees," Featheringill said. "People shouldn't be scared of bees; people should understand bees."
Aaron Krause
Jul 25, 2010

akrause@norwalkreflector.com

BELLEVUE Historic Lyme Village's Pioneer Days allows people to experience life as it was in the 1800s and early 1900s. But, there is at least one demonstrator who will talk about a practice that has as much use today as in years past.

At Pioneer Days this weekend, Rural North Fairfield resident Ken Featheringill will discuss the importance of bees and the products they make .

"The public needs to be educated about our honey bees," Featheringill said. "People shouldn't be scared of bees; people should understand bees."

Featheringill and his wife, Pat, have been working with honey bees since about 15 years ago, when a woman gave them several hives. Between the couple, the Featheringills maintain 30 hives throughout Huron County. That involves, in part, feeding the bees sugar water and manipulating them to produce more honey.

"You get stung every now and then, that's for sure," Featheringill said. "I just tough it up and go on."

He said the best thing about beekeeping is "eating that good, old honey."

But while many may associate bees with honey, Featheringill said there are many foods we wouldn't have without bees. Among them: apples, raspberries, strawberries, watermelon, pumpkins and squash all of which bees pollinate.

Speaking of food, visitors to Settler Days can enjoy fare such as Rick's Home-made Ice Cream and The Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War's fried bread.

In all, more than 150 costumed re-enactors, demonstrating crafters, sutler and musicians will seek to engage, inform and inspire. Visitors can view the handiwork of the Huron Valley Quilt Guild on display in the Post Mark Collectors Club Museum tap their feet to the music and sing along with the Lyme Village Pioneers at the shelter.

Children can visit the hands-on activity tent, attend one-room school sessions, story telling, and try old fashioned games like graces, stilts and hoop rolling.

Youngsters age 6 to 12 are admitted to Pioneer Days for $3, while adult admission is $5.

The event takes place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday.