Puppy taken from woman who won't have it neutered at 9 weeks old

Collie mix rescued from abandoned home was being cared for by area woman.
Aaron Krause
Mar 11, 2013

An area woman fostered a puppy rescued from an abandoned home in Kentucky through an organization created to assist with the homeless pet overpopulation.

Lou Anne Michel formed bond with the collie mix she calls Shiloh, recalling how the animal went from being anti-social and aggressive to a well-received member of her family.

When a representative from the organization called Michel to tell her she needed to get Shiloh neutered at 9 weeks of age, a conflict developed between her and organization officials. "They came to my house to take the puppy and did not allow me to say good-bye or take the expensive food and toys I had purchased for him," Michel said.

A story with comments from both sides of the controversy appears in Monday's Reflector. To read the story, pick up a copy of that issue of the Reflector or subscribe to the e-paper (a complete digital replica of the issue) for less than $1 per week and read it now.

Comments

Ehovemom

She agreed when she took ownership of dog. No story here.

Lillie Chaos

There is a story here. Rescue groups are often not the noble groups you see in the media. When I was interested in adding to my family I haunted dogs in Huron and surrounding counties. Usually the only animals available for me to adopt were larger cross bred hunting dogs. I have nothing against those animals but I wanted something less than 50 pounds as an inside dog. Often I would see cages on hold or reserved for so-called rescue groups. Animal adoption has developed a whole new money making venue for many people. Administrators get volunteer help but no thought is given to the wages paid to the administration for time invested. You are never actually the owner of the dog. They feel it is their right to inspect where the animal is living, expect you to have special housing and maintain the right to take the animal back from you for whatever reason they feel is necessary. AND they expect payment for the dog "to cover med expenses" -- price often ranging 200 to 500 dollars! Has anyone suggested you adopt a special needs dog? Often a senior dog with real health issues.....pardon me but you are paying for heartache. I suggest each person really research this issue before adopting. Check with the local vets...they are often less expensive than the "adoption fee" charged by rescue groups. Especially in our area! If you want to donate money check with local county facility. Because of the noble gesture claimed by some, if not most, of these facilities they are taking advantage of kind hearted Americans. Think about it....would you buy a cow or hog from farmer that was not healthy or in good condition? Pretty rude of me to write this comment isn't it..... I am an animal lover but I have personally experienced the lack of credibility of so-called rescue groups. You are buying an animal often never really owning that animal and subject to inspections that seems noble but are often preying on adoptive owners and used as donation leverage. Think long and hard when obtaining a pet. Am sure there are good groups out there but often the rescue groups use places like Pet Finders to advertise what they have for SALE.....that is exactly what it is....a Sale with strings attached.

Swamp Fox

Lillie Chaos, Why would you "haunt" a dog, are you a ghost? There are good reasons that they have standards for adoption, they must be careful as possible to stop people who will not care for the animals responsibility. Every dog I ever had came either from a humane society or rescure, and the only expense was vets bills which was always lower than I would have paid for the same level of care from my own vet. The only restriction was that they are house dogs, given all needed vet care, neutered or spade within a few weeks and treated humanely. I am sure there is more to your sage that you are telling.

bnjjad

They are right about some of their claims. Some adoption agencies demand intial inspections (which I understand for first time adopters) and secondary inspections after the fact to check for special housing/food/toys. Not to mention they require you to allow them to take back the animal for any number of reasons (which are not always followed to a T or clear to the adopter). Some adoption agencies are ok, however some are predatory and are just as bad as puppy mills IMO. If you adopt kids, you generally don't have children services doing surprise inspections for the next 18 years do you?

Lillie Chaos

@ Swamp.......I visited the local dog warden ....Huron County never had a "hold" on any animals for rescue groups that I saw. I went to other shelters when in the area hoping to find a smaller non-hunting breed. County agencies and rescues are like comparing apples to oranges. My experience and comments are posted to encourage people to think for themselves not just buy into the advertisements on-line.

Swamp Fox

I have adopted numerous family pets from both humane societies and rescues, I never had a follow up inspection, they do always check with your vet, most times I didn't even have one visit, my guess is that my vets's recommendation made a visit unnecessary. I would like to know how any non profit humane society or rescue could be "predatory." My experience with both Huron & Erie County Humane Societies and rescues is that there must be a place in heaven for these folks for the work they do in helping unwanted animals.

ladydye_5

Humane Societies and (some)rescues are TWO different things. Some are for non-profit and the well being of animals....the others are for profit and pretty shady. I have heard of people not being able to adopt a dog because they had stairs in their home. Unless the dog has a medical condition, it should not matter what food you feed a dog. I personally was not allowed to adopt a dog because my husband was not with me (he worked 3rd shift and was in bed) and they were "leary" of me due to the fact they never heard of my vet clinic. The restrictions on some applications, not to mention the fine print of TAKING the dog back for any reason the rescue seems fit. Just like any other part of life, there are good rescues and bad rescues. Do your homework, read the fine print and do NOT sign it if you do not like/understand it. I only adopt from the Dog Warden or The Humane Society....the rescues I have heard/seen/read about are too questionable to me.

bnjjad

Exactly what ladydye_5 said. There is a difference between Humane Society and Adoption Clinics. Human Societies are usually the better alternative because of some of the issues with these clinics. If you go to petfinder.com you will find a lot of these mysterious adoption clinics that have these rules.

Lillie Chaos

@ Swamp......just for the record....I have not had "numerous" dogs as you state you have. When I get a dog it is for keeps. I have only had 3 dogs in the last 30 years or so. All of my dogs lived a very reasonable life span. 12, 14, and 17 -- so I am not a frequent shopper. I try to be very careful when adding to my family.

rickross2

I always buy my dogs new. Not certified pre-owned.

Swamp Fox

With all the great dogs available at pounds, humane societies and rescues I would never buy a dog, they should not be for profit!

lgahr

At least you know what you are getting and where it has been. I agree

Swamp Fox

Lillie Chaos, your first quote "Often I would see cages on hold or reserved for so-called rescue groups. " your second quote "I visited the local dog warden ....Huron County never had a "hold" on any animals for rescue groups that I saw." Which is?

lgahr

duplicate

Windy

9 weeks is a bit young for neutering. 4-6 months is better.

lgahr

How many dogs are numerous? Where are they now?

Swamp Fox

Numerous are all the dogs my family has had, all lived a long happy life as a member of the family and died with us holding them. As for "buying" puppies to each there own, but with all the great unwanted dogs looking for homes adoption is the humane option. How many people who buys that "cute" puppy dumps it when it grows up to be a dog, thus causing the problem. When I go to a rescue or humane society I have a chance to bond with the adult dog. I might "not know where they have been" but I know now that they are a part of our family. Dogs should not be for profit, they are living creatures not objects.

Firelandsobserver

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