OUR VIEW - Snake eyes: Gambling has few supporters

Ohio voters' have hit the jackpot at least on the issue of gambling. Rather than have a government that ignores the clear will of its citizens, Gov. Ted Strickland has followed the voters' lead and taken a hard-line stance against gambling. In November, voters overwhelmingly shot down a proposal to allow slot machines at the state's seven race tracks. At issue recently have been video game consoles found at some bars and restaurants that work like slot machines with potential payouts.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 25, 2010

Ohio voters' have hit the jackpot at least on the issue of gambling. Rather than have a government that ignores the clear will of its citizens, Gov. Ted Strickland has followed the voters' lead and taken a hard-line stance against gambling.

In November, voters overwhelmingly shot down a proposal to allow slot machines at the state's seven race tracks. At issue recently have been video game consoles found at some bars and restaurants that work like slot machines with potential payouts.

The debate focused on whether these video machines were so-called "games of skill," rather than luck Ohio's gambling law only permits the former. Strickland cut the issue off at the knees and said the state should ban any cash payments or prizes worth more than $10, and limit the total to $600 per player.

Some anti-gambling groups argue Strickland does not go far enough, focusing on the payout instead of simply banning the machines. However, we think Strickland's stance on the issue is crystal clear. Like Ohio voters, he has told the gambling lobby that they have few friends here and their attempts to expand gambling are bound to fail.

Comments

Cato (Anonymous)

Once again, The State of Ohio fiscally shoots itself in the collective foot by rejecting gaming as an acceptable revenue source. It's citizens who wish to game will merely continue to travel to other states in order to wager - those states' gain and Ohio's loss.

Cato (Anonymous)

Obviously the citizens of the State of Ohio have loudly spoken. In order to pay for the state's future needs for ever expanding government sponsored health and welfare services they desire higher taxes placed on themselves and corporations.

American 1st (A...

It's never a good idea to give government more money by any means. Gambling would give government another revenue source (not a good thing) and would cost all of us far more than it would gain. Most people see this. Let the other states have it, keeping the problems away from us.

Cato (Anonymous)

It's sheer folly to think that the progressively aging baby boomers will not require expanded government supported health and welfare services. From where will these funds for these services be obtained? Ever increasing state and local tax rates? Legalized gaming is a perfectly acceptable revenue source and it hase been shown to be a reasonable offset for more taxes. The state could also use the jobs gaming will provide.

Kenny Rogers (A...

No it would be foolish to get more money coming into Ohio. Let the tax payers continue to pay and pay and pay some more.

for a taste of ...

my parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, and sister all frequent casinos. casinos aren't dirty, nasty places full of crime. if anything, they are the exact opposite. everybody that enters a casino is there to have a good time, some win, some lose. casinos are a billion dollar industry - yes that is a billion with a b. casinos have re-vitalized areas such as southern and northern indiana. several people flock daily to the niagara casinos and also the new one in erie, pa. a lot of those people are ohio citizens spending their ohio dollars across state lines.

the problem that i see is that there are a lot of people that are against gambling yet they play bingo every week or play scratch off's daily or they play mega-millions. Folks - it's all gambling.

again, the casinos in southern indiana have really brightened up some sour spots such as rising sun and evansville.

until people open up their collective eyes and see that gambling is not such a terrible taboo like the movies make it out to be (Oceans 11-13), ohio citizens will continue to spend ohio dollars in Pennsylvania, Michigan, West Virginia, New York, Indiana, and Canada.