Future Western students will suffer from cuts

I am a senior at Western Reserve and have a younger sister that is a freshman. I was disappointed in the school board for waiting until this late in the school year to notify teachers that their positions were eliminated. Schools hiring new teachers like to have all personnel hired by June 1, so they do not have to worry about staffing over the summer. These teachers should have been notified by, at the latest, the middle of April. Why did the school board allow the districts finances to get so bad? Why didn't the school board notify the public that cuts were possible and give them a chance to voice their opinions? An "executive session" was held to decide which teachers would be cut before the public had any idea what was going on. As a matter of fact, no one had any idea what was going on until the students found out on May 15 and made it their personal mission to tell the public.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 25, 2010

 

I am a senior at Western Reserve and have a younger sister that is a freshman. I was disappointed in the school board for waiting until this late in the school year to notify teachers that their positions were eliminated. Schools hiring new teachers like to have all personnel hired by June 1, so they do not have to worry about staffing over the summer. These teachers should have been notified by, at the latest, the middle of April.

Why did the school board allow the districts finances to get so bad? Why didn't the school board notify the public that cuts were possible and give them a chance to voice their opinions? An "executive session" was held to decide which teachers would be cut before the public had any idea what was going on. As a matter of fact, no one had any idea what was going on until the students found out on May 15 and made it their personal mission to tell the public.

At the May 17 meeting, many people suggested ideas for cutting costs without cutting so many personnel. Several parents mentioned eliminating air conditioning, drug testing which costs about $20,000 per year and the phone lines in the school. The school board just purchased a brand new pick up truck for the custodial department, rumored to have been worth about $40,000. Couldn't they have purchased a used one for quite a bit less?

The board office just a received a pay raise this month. Sports could be converted to pay-to-play, which may not be a popular idea, but would certainly cut down on expenses. The personnel could also be asked about a freeze on raises until the district gets back on its feet.

I am glad that I will not have to return to Western Reserve next year and see how the students and faculty will be affected by these changes. I do hope however, that the students will see how their school has been affected, and learn that they need to be more involved in what happens at their school.

Allison Priess

Western Reserve student