Saving the Earth done through small choices

Yes, it's true. Sunday was another Earth Day. Time once again to tell ourselves how much we love the Earth. In fact, a recent Gallup Poll shows that 52 percent of Americans think they are doing a good job trying to protect the environment. But I have a feeling these are the same people who take their children to the Toledo Zoo in an SUV that will cost them $79 in gas for a round trip. They probably hit the Web sit EcoFabulous (upscale, name dropping eco-friendly items) and buy organic Ketchup.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 24, 2010

Yes, it's true. Sunday was another Earth Day. Time once again to tell ourselves how much we love the Earth. In fact, a recent Gallup Poll shows that 52 percent of Americans think they are doing a good job trying to protect the environment.

But I have a feeling these are the same people who take their children to the Toledo Zoo in an SUV that will cost them $79 in gas for a round trip. They probably hit the Web sit EcoFabulous (upscale, name dropping eco-friendly items) and buy organic Ketchup.

That's really great. But that isn't much help.

What really matters are the small things. A small commitment, done every single day, will do more to improve the environment than a few, high profile "Earth friendly" moments.

It works the same way as a savings account, except you are making your environmental foot print smaller. We know a small amount saved each pay day will get us farther than trying to put a lump sum in later.

Here are a few little things to do:

Recycle, even if it's just your newspaper, everyday. In one year, that equals 1 ton of paper.

Support your local parks and playgrounds. Green space is important.

Pick one day a week and park the car. Either ride, share, walk or stay home.

Find something you were just going to pitch and fix it.

Walk away. Look at one thing you were going to buy that isn't necessary and put it back.

Donate. Magazines, baby items, cell phones, the list goes on and one. Donate these items.

Cut back on chemicals. I know I probably use twice as much laundry spray as is needed.

The same Gallop poll I mentioned showed 98 percent of people though they should spend money to make their homes more energy efficient; 77 percent thought they should take mass transit whenever possible; 62 percent thought they should buy a hybrid car.

Let's do the reality check. Less than one half of 1 percent of Americans own a hybrid car. I think we have a long, long, long way to go.

Pam Hansberger

Norwalk