Reflector too quick to accept corporate rhetoric about job cuts

I would like to comment on the Reflector's editorial "Don't blame business for moving jobs." It is my belief that the Reflector is failing to see the complete picture concerning job loss and a company's need for profits. I don't know of anyone who would disagree with the statement that a business is not a charity and that they need to make money. Where I think we fail is in accepting their seemingly endless need for more and more money, at the expense of loyal employees and local economic stability.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 24, 2010

 

I would like to comment on the Reflector's editorial "Don't blame business for moving jobs."

It is my belief that the Reflector is failing to see the complete picture concerning job loss and a company's need for profits. I don't know of anyone who would disagree with the statement that a business is not a charity and that they need to make money. Where I think we fail is in accepting their seemingly endless need for more and more money, at the expense of loyal employees and local economic stability.

I do not comment here directly regarding Epic Technologies, but the recent corporate climate in general. Over the last several years, corporate profits have soared, along with executive compensation, while concern for communities and employees has fallen by the wayside. The editorial states that it is the nature of companies to maximize profits. It needn't be that way. What is wrong with a reasonable profit, sharing the wealth with employees and communities, and maintaining a long-term relationship as such? I don't need to make $100 per hour any more than a CEO needs to make $10,000 per hour.

I think the Reflector is too quick to accept the corporate rhetoric that "This is how we have to operate and what else can we do?"

I do agree that we can and should be working toward repealing free trade laws, and removing from office the people who support(ed) them.

Lastly, I don't like the prices at Wal-mart, not when I take into consideration the true costs of their products after I've supplied their underpaid workers with healthcare and food stamps, and millions of my fellow workers have lost their jobs. Suddenly their prices seem exorbitant! And no, I haven't spent a dollar at Wal-mart in at least 12 years!

Please don't be so quick to accept the corporate smokescreen that they have no other choice.

Matthew B. Most

Monroeville