OUR VIEW

Epic Technologies said it would be cutting 60 jobs from its Norwalk workforce. Many of those jobs are going to Mexico. When American jobs move south of the border, it is inevitable that some people are going to be angry. Perhaps they should be angry, but they shouldn't be angry with the company that's moving the jobs.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 24, 2010

 

Epic Technologies said it would be cutting 60 jobs from its Norwalk workforce. Many of those jobs are going to Mexico.

When American jobs move south of the border, it is inevitable that some people are going to be angry. Perhaps they should be angry, but they shouldn't be angry with the company that's moving the jobs.

It is the nature of companies to maximize profits. Of course, employees are important they are a major contributor to the overall health of a firm. However, at the end of the day, companies are not charities: they are there to make money.

And we are glad they are. If companies didn't strive to make as much money as possible, American industry would be quickly surpassed and we would watch one of the highest standards of living in the world go into inexorable decline.

But there is another benefit to companies behaving this way. That is, they are predictable. And if they are predictable, they can be manipulated to serve the needs of society, whatever we judge, through the political process, those needs to be.

The system is working. In moving jobs to Mexico, companies are doing exactly what they have been told to. The sequence of events that sent Epic's jobs to Mexico began the day NAFTA was signed into law.

If Americans don't like what's happening, there's a simple solution: Repeal or reform free trade laws. When we do that, however, we ought to reflect on the fact that closing borders has never improved a modern country's economy and we ought to remember how much we like the prices at Wal-Mart.