OUR VIEW - Bridging gap to learn why they cross the border

On Wednesday more than 70 public officials, business owners, employees and county residents attended a cultural diversity workshop. The goal of the workshop was to promote a better, deeper understanding of Hispanic culture. Such events are admirable, and the Huron County Hispanic Taskforce, led by Norwalk Mayor Sue Lesch, deserves credit for its efforts to bridge the cultural gap. Because, as one Hispanic speaker put it, you cannot hope to serve the Hispanic community be it in public service or private business if you don't understand why Hispanic people come to the United States in the first place.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 24, 2010

On Wednesday more than 70 public officials, business owners, employees and county residents attended a cultural diversity workshop. The goal of the workshop was to promote a better, deeper understanding of Hispanic culture.

Such events are admirable, and the Huron County Hispanic Taskforce, led by Norwalk Mayor Sue Lesch, deserves credit for its efforts to bridge the cultural gap. Because, as one Hispanic speaker put it, you cannot hope to serve the Hispanic community be it in public service or private business if you don't understand why Hispanic people come to the United States in the first place.

Such outreach programs also help address Americans' fears and ignorance of Hispanics and fight the clichd mentality, "they just want to take our jobs." Reasonable people can disagree on the proper approach to the issue of immigration, but it is important that emotions and fears be set aside to tackle the debate logically and find solutions that serve both the Hispanic community and the business leaders who rely on that workforce. The reason Hispanics come to America is the same reason many of our ancestors made the treacherous journey years and years ago to make a better life for themselves and their families.