BLAST FROM THE PAST - J.B. DeWitt dies at 65

MARCH 13, 1933 The top stories in the Norwalk Reflector-Herald on this date 74 years ago:
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 24, 2010

 

MARCH 13, 1933

The top stories in the Norwalk Reflector-Herald on this date 74 years ago:

Death takes J.S. DeWitt at early hour

Norwalk suffered a well nigh irreparable loss when the hand of death was gently laid upon J.B. DeWitt, 65, Norwalk furniture merchant who passed away this morning at 3:45 o'clock at his home, 12 State Street, after an illness of about five months.

Although in a serious condition, Mr. DeWitt was able to give considerable time to his business affairs until five weeks ago when he entered Memorial hospital here. About two weeks ago he was admitted to Lakeside Hospital Clevaland. He was returned to his home from that institution on March 6.

Born and reared on a farm near Plymouth, Mr. DeWitt was the son of the late Thomas and Margaret Anne DeWitt. He was one of a family of 12 children.

Surviving are the widow, the daughter, Mrs. Harold Malcolm. Two grandchildren, Mary Lou and Jean Malcomb, and the five sisters, Mrs. Ada Landis, Mrs. Etta Cline, Mrs. Milo Simmonson, Mrs. Alton Calkins and Mrs. Frank Kosht, all of Cleveland. Two sisters and a brother are dead.

Mrs. Scott and daughter hurt in earthquake

W.G. Carpenter of Norwalk today informed the Reflector-Herald that Mrs. Nina Minard Scott and daughter Gene, who were injured as a result of the earthquake at Long Beach, Cal., are recovering. Mrs. Scott was born and reared in Milan and had lived in Norwalk for a time.

Mrs. Andrew Frey of 118 E. Seminary St., sent a message to Long Beach Saturday in order to ascertain if any of her relatives had been injured. This morning, her sister, Mrs. I.D. Follette, telegraphed that members of the family were not injured although their home had been demolished by the earthquake.

Fire damages Williams home

Fire of an undetermined origin broke out at the Wm. Williams home at 17 Marshall Street Sunday and damage by fire and water was estimated at about $400. There was no fire in the store at the home as it had been allowed to go out so the stove pipe and store could be cleaned out. Much of the roof and one clothes closet was destroyed by the fire.

Third run of sap is expected

Production of maple syrup in Huron County gives promise of breaking records for many years. A number of producers report they have been favored by two good runs of sap. The breaking of the cold snap yesterday is expected to result in another good run.

The quality, perhaps, never was better. In normal years, a gall of syrup weighs about 11.5 pounds to grade first class. This season, 12-pound weight or more is commonly reported. This shows that the average gallon of 1933 syrup contains about four pounds of maple sugar suspended in the solution. Quite a number of maple orchards of the county are expected to produce 300 gallons or more of syrup. The average production so far this season has been about 50 to 75 gallons.

Compiled by Andy Prutsok