Don't give away pets

Recently a story made the headlines about a dog that was used at the Cleveland Clinic by a neurosurgeon to demonstrate a piece of equipment to a group of salespeople. The large mixed breed dog suffered from a deliberately induced brain aneurysm. It was later destroyed because of the damage caused by the aneurysm. Did you ever wonder how animals for such testing are obtained? Many times it is from "Free To Good Home" ads in the newspaper. Now I am in no way saying that the dog in this situation was obtained in this manner or that the Cleveland Clinic employs such practices to get animals for their testing lab. However, many of the animals used for testing are obtained by people who respond to such ads. These people are called "Bunchers." These people gather free pets until they have enough for a trip to a Class B Dealer who is licensed by the USDA to sell animals from "random sources" for research. The Buncher may only get $25 a head for former pets, while a dealer can get between $100 to $450 per pet. The Class B dealer probably already has a contract with certain facilities, and will transport them to other areas within a state, even out of state.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 24, 2010

Recently a story made the headlines about a dog that was used at the Cleveland Clinic by a neurosurgeon to demonstrate a piece of equipment to a group of salespeople. The large mixed breed dog suffered from a deliberately induced brain aneurysm. It was later destroyed because of the damage caused by the aneurysm. Did you ever wonder how animals for such testing are obtained?

Many times it is from "Free To Good Home" ads in the newspaper. Now I am in no way saying that the dog in this situation was obtained in this manner or that the Cleveland Clinic employs such practices to get animals for their testing lab. However, many of the animals used for testing are obtained by people who respond to such ads. These people are called "Bunchers." These people gather free pets until they have enough for a trip to a Class B Dealer who is licensed by the USDA to sell animals from "random sources" for research. The Buncher may only get $25 a head for former pets, while a dealer can get between $100 to $450 per pet. The Class B dealer probably already has a contract with certain facilities, and will transport them to other areas within a state, even out of state.

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