ENTERTAINMENT INSEITZ - 'Pride & Prejudice' an overlooked gem

It's not every day I agree with the critics. More often than not, critics don't like anything at all in the movie world that's main stream. They pick the most obscure film they can find and then nominate it for everything.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 24, 2010

 

It's not every day I agree with the critics.

More often than not, critics don't like anything at all in the movie world that's main stream. They pick the most obscure film they can find and then nominate it for everything.

It's kind of like Bud Light. No one really admits they drink it, but it's one of the top-selling beers in America. People always say their favorite beer is one where I can't even get the cap off.

But every once in a while all the forces of the universe get together.

This happened in the 2005 movie, "Pride & Prejudice."

I might have mentioned my fondness for this film in a past column, but never properly reviewed it.

Yes, it's another adaptation of the Jane Austen novel.

This film has star power, including Keira Knightley, Donald Sutherland, Brenda Blethyn and Judi Dench.

It's based on the traditional themes of the haves and have-nots and falls into the late-1700s time period.

Blethyn and Sutherland have five daughters. Blethyn is determined to marry them off as soon as possible.

Knightley is the second-eldest daughter and will marry for love or never at all.

Matthew MacFadyen plays a local aristocrat who both cares for and torments the Knightley character.

The two are destined to be together, but not until everything else is set right in their lives which makes the movie frustrating yet fulfilling.

I read online where Roger Ebert said he takes little interest in on-screen romances, but truly was pleased with how this film ended. He was actually rooting for the Knightley and MacFadyen characters to hook up.

Many other critics agree that this version of "Pride & Prejudice" is the best adaptation of Jane Austen.

Like other winning films, the movie has top-notch acting, dialogue and sets.

It incorporates classical music with a ballroom dancing scene. This is how dancing should be used in a movie. See "13 Going on 30" as how to not use dancing.

I have tried to push this movie with some of the movie experts here at the Reflector.

The usual reaction I get is the same look a person would have on their face if they were choking on a chicken bone. That look is usually followed by a complete recap of the prior evening's American Idol episode.

Comments

hhdesigns (Anon...

I'm glad someone else agrees , this is absolutely one of my favorite movies !