Local incoming kindergartners are being safe

School may be out for the summer, but a couple hundred incoming kindergartners are still learning. They are learning things such as the significance of 9-1-1, the importance of crossing the street safely, how to act when approached by a stranger, the job of a police officer and firefighter and fire safety.
Aaron Krause
Jul 25, 2010

 

School may be out for the summer, but a couple hundred incoming kindergartners are still learning.

They are learning things such as the significance of 9-1-1, the importance of crossing the street safely, how to act when approached by a stranger, the job of a police officer and firefighter and fire safety.

The children are enrolled in the 42nd annual Safety Town, a program run by local safety forces.

The program lasts four weeks and encompasses five different classes.

The current class, which numbers about 60, began Tuesday and will last through Friday, when the children graduate.

On Wednesday, Norwalk Police Detective David Pigman, who was in one of the first Safety Town classes, led the youngsters on a tour of the police station. They saw, among other things, the dispatch center and learned there were surveillance cameras.

"So she knows we're not doing anything bad," one child asked.

"Yep, she knows you're not doing anything bad," Pigman responded.

The children also got to sit in a police car, learned about the equipment a police officer carries and toured the fire station.

"It's amazing how well they retain the stuff," Pigman said.

Older youngsters, who volunteer to assist with Safety Town, help reinforce what the young children learn. The assistants must have completed the fifth grade.

"They're great kids," Pigman said. "I couldn't do it without them."