Reflector employee becomes new American citizen

Today is a banner day for Trevor Clark he will be sworn in as a citizen of the United States and his wife, Linda, will be by his side. "It will make me proud and grateful to America for having me," said the native of Southampton, England, who fell in love with and married his wife after meeting her on the Internet. "I've gone through the paperwork and the interviews and Monday (today) I'm going to take the oath," Clark said Friday. One of the first rights he's looking forward to as an American is voting.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 25, 2010

Today is a banner day for Trevor Clark he will be sworn in as a citizen of the United States and his wife, Linda, will be by his side.

"It will make me proud and grateful to America for having me," said the native of Southampton, England, who fell in love with and married his wife after meeting her on the Internet.

"I've gone through the paperwork and the interviews and Monday (today) I'm going to take the oath," Clark said Friday. One of the first rights he's looking forward to as an American is voting.

Clark met Linda, originally from Ashland, through a chat room.

"Something just clicked," he said. "I assume it was the same for her."

The couple talked online for about three months before they decided to use private chat rooms.

"It was another six months before I came over to see her," Clark said of his first visit in May of 2000. "We really hit it off straight away."

Since his VISA only allowed him to stay for three months, Clark returned to England for a week and then got another three-month VISA.

"After he second time I came over, they said I had to essentially get a fiancee VISA," he said. "That took me five months to get."

It also took a little wind out of his sails, so to speak.

"When I finally did get that, you're under the stipulation that you have to get married within three months," he said. "It kind of took the romance out of it. I would have done it anyway, but it felt like it was under duress."

Regardless of the circumstances that brought Clark here, he has worked for the Norwalk Reflector for seven years in the mail room and he and Linda are happily living in Norwalk.

Settling down in a small-town in Ohio might seem a little strange for Clark, considering his background as a carpenter on more than one continent.

"I've lived in South Africa and France," he said. "I've got restless feet. She's knows I've been around a little bit."

But now he's satisfied with his job for the newspaper and his life in America, even though he has a daughter and brother still in England.

"My wife's here," he said. "Really I just tend to be happy wherever I am. I think its who you're with rather than where you are."