Snyder hired as city's new engineer

"He's a good fit," Mayor Sue Lesch said of Joshua R. Snyder, P.E., who has accepted the position of public works director for the city of Norwalk. Snyder is currently the traffic engineer for the city of Sandusky. A registered professional engineer for nine years, he graduated from Tri-State University in Angola, Ind. with a degree in civil engineering.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 25, 2010

"He's a good fit," Mayor Sue Lesch said of Joshua R. Snyder, P.E., who has accepted the position of public works director for the city of Norwalk.

Snyder is currently the traffic engineer for the city of Sandusky. A registered professional engineer for nine years, he graduated from Tri-State University in Angola, Ind. with a degree in civil engineering.

"I am very excited and honored to accept the position of city engineer," Snyder said. "This is a career goal for me and I am eager to begin working toward progressing with the city of Norwalk."

Snyder lives with his wife, Pamela, and their 4-year old son, Jeffrey, in Vickery.

The director of public works position was developed to provide the most efficient means of operating the city's public works departments. The new director will oversee the management of water treatment and distribution, wastewater treatment and collections, streets, street lighting and signals, and zoning departments, as well as coordinating city capital improvement projects.

"I am pleased that Josh has accepted this position," Lesch said. "In addition to a strong resume and broad experience with the city of Sandusky, Josh is highly motivated and enthusiastic. He will bring an energy to this position that will keep our city moving forward.

"I also was very impressed with Josh's communication skills, both with employees and the general public," she said. "He is a team player."

Lesch also expressed her appreciation to former Public Works Coordinator Ralph Seward. "I want to thank Ralph Seward once again for stepping in and helping us out these last six months," she said. "Ralph has also made himself available to work with Josh in his first few months."

Seward originally retired in April 2007 after helping the city's previous public works director, Jim Sawyer, move into the position. Sawyer left his job last year after just 10 months and Lesch said last year one of her top priorities this year was to find a replacement. Seward came out of retirement to run the department for the city until another director could be hired.

Sawyer was hired after the city changed the position to require a civil engineering degree. One reason for that change, Lesch said, was to save money by having an internal engineer who could review plans instead of having all plans sent out to private engineering firms.