JUST LIKE OLD TIMES - Methodist preachers first used Berlin Chapel

Travelers on Ohio 113 southeast of Berlin Heights pass by a small burial ground usually known as the Poyer Cemetery. This was a neighborhood burial ground and might have been considered a Methodist cemetery in the 1800's. The oldest marker burial is dated 1836, though there might well be earlier, unmarked graves. It developed on the farm of Jehiel Seeley, who deeded it in 1868 to the Berlin Township Trustees. Just to the east of it was a lot, which Seeley deeded in the 1830's to the Methodist Church of the United States, where they could build a meeting house and where they could allow Methodist preachers to preach and expound, according to the text of the original deed.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 24, 2010

Travelers on Ohio 113 southeast of Berlin Heights pass by a small burial ground usually known as the Poyer Cemetery. This was a neighborhood burial ground and might have been considered a Methodist cemetery in the 1800's.

The oldest marker burial is dated 1836, though there might well be earlier, unmarked graves. It developed on the farm of Jehiel Seeley, who deeded it in 1868 to the Berlin Township Trustees. Just to the east of it was a lot, which Seeley deeded in the 1830's to the Methodist Church of the United States, where they could build a meeting house and where they could allow Methodist preachers to preach and expound, according to the text of the original deed.

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