AGRI-BUSINESS NEWS AND NOTES - Why care about agriculture?

Non-Insured Assistance program participants are reminded we need your production evidence and input bills before we can finalize any claims you may have. When establishing your APH (Actual Production History) the verifiable records you provide to the county office are very important. Without adequate documentation to support your production, your APH could end up at the county average, rather than what you actually produced.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 24, 2010

Non-Insured Assistance program participants are reminded we need your production evidence and input bills before we can finalize any claims you may have.

When establishing your APH (Actual Production History) the verifiable records you provide to the county office are very important. Without adequate documentation to support your production, your APH could end up at the county average, rather than what you actually produced.

While this is a time consuming task, it will be well worth it in the end if you should have a loss. A very important date to remember is March 15.

That is the last day to purchase NAP coverage on your spring seeded crops and to provide the office with a list of the crops you intend to plant for the 2007 year. Coverage is at the rate of $100 per crop with the maximum amount charged to a producer in a county being $300, no matter how many crops are covered.

Not a farmer? Why should you care about agriculture?

When you see an article on farming, anyone who is not involved in agriculture production will usually ignore it. I am not a farmer, so why should I be interested in what is going on in the agricultural community? While you may not be involved in the production of crops, every American should be interested in farming.

Everyday you and your family consume the crops that our farmers work so hard to produce for us. For example, the annual per capita consumption of major food commodities is something close to 130.1 pounds of fresh fruit, 23.2 gallons of milk, 29.8 pounds of cheese, 200.8 pounds of flour and cereal products, 192.1 pounds of fresh vegetables, 116.7 pounds of red meat, 257.1 eggs, and 68.4 pounds of poultry, just to name a few.

These products are produced by the farmers of our country for our daily use. In America, due to our fertile soils, farmers can produce more than enough agricultural products to feed our country at a reasonable price. That is not the case in all areas of the world. For that reason, America exports about 18 percent of its agricultural products annually to countries worldwide.

At the same time farmers are producing safe and affordable food products for our consumption, the farmers are taking steps to protect our environment by installing filter strip buffers to improve our soil, air, and water quality, enhance wildlife habitat, and create scenic landscapes. In addition, they are establishing wetlands, and planting trees.

All of these efforts will benefit our community today and our future generations to come. About 36 million acres of fertile farmland is now enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program to protect the environment and provide wildlife habitat, ensuring our land will remain productive far into the future.

The next time you see an article on farming, take a moment to read it. Even if you are not involved in agriculture production, agriculture affects each and every one of us on a daily basis.

The next time you order a pizza remember without our farmers that pizza would not be available to us to enjoy. Because of them, and the products they produce, such as wheat, tomatoes, cheese, mushrooms, onions, sausage, and green peppers, Americans eat enough pizza to cover nearly 100 football fields each and every day.

Pizza is just one of our favorite foods that farmers create for us.

Diana Strouse is the county executive director for the Huron and Erie County Farm Service Agency. For more information, call the agency at (419) 668-4113.