'I'm stuck' - Still no answers for Elm Street Flooding

Several residents of Elm Street attended Tuesday's work session for Norwalk City Council to voice complaints and ask questions about frequent flooding problems in the last two years. Marilyn Seiler, of 51 E. Elm St., wanted to know why her basement has flooded five times since heavy rains in June of 2006 when it hadn't flooded since 1969 before the 2006 problem.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 25, 2010

 

Several residents of Elm Street attended Tuesday's work session for Norwalk City Council to voice complaints and ask questions about frequent flooding problems in the last two years.

Marilyn Seiler, of 51 E. Elm St., wanted to know why her basement has flooded five times since heavy rains in June of 2006 when it hadn't flooded since 1969 before the 2006 problem.

"Are you guys going to do anything about those houses at risk?" she asked. "What am I supposed to do? I cannot put my house on the market to sell. I'm stuck."

Norwalk Mayor Sue Lesch said even though the possibility of the city buying up to five problem homes in the area was brought up after the 2006 flooding, the city couldn't get funding even for just three of the homes.

Lucy Hokes, of 32 E. Elm St., asked what had changed to make the area flood more in the last two years.

"Something is going on at the reservoir," she said as she asked several questions about city operations. "This isn't rainwater. This is water from the creek and the reservoir. You've spent an awful lot of money on studies and nothing's getting done."

Bill McKinney, of 59 E. Elm St., and Dick Barna, of 52 E. Elm St., also voiced their concerns about flooding. Barna said he never had a problem until bridges on Elm Street and Benedict Avenue were replaced.

Lesch said flooding was caused because of "too much water too quickly" being dumped in the area. She said the Ohio Department of Transportation replaced the Benedict Avenue bridge according to their regulations and the city has looked at the suggestion of putting up a flood wall and another culvert, but a study had shown those measures wouldn't help the problem Elm Street residents face.

She said the reservoir has been managed the same way for the past 30 years so that couldn't account for more flooding.

Lesch and council members agreed to ask the engineering firm that studied flooding in the area to come back to meet both with homeowners and with council to take another look at the issues.

Comments

yep (Anonymous)

perhaps we can build a dam.

put it on the ballots. like hoover dam.

since when is a creek flooding a surprise?

why should the city be responsible for this?

wondered why that house at the way bottom of the hill

by the creek was so cheap, eh???

imagine those people in huron with that lake in their front yards. what a nuisance.

Common Sense (A...

I have sympathy for the people who own homes in that area - to an extent. I agree with the previous comment that it's a risk anytime you buy near water - it just so happens that there has been increased water levels in the last couple of years. Maybe the next decade will be fine. That is the risk. I'm really not sure why the city should be expected to financially rescue the people who live in the Elm Street neighborhood - unless it is proven that increased levels of water have been released from the resevoir - and I'm not sure if that can be proven.