Water doesn't part for sweeties

JAN. 24, 1927 The top stories in the Norwalk Reflector-Herald on this date 81 years ago: Water barrier keeps youth from sweetie The following is the story of an unsuccessful effort of a young man to drive his car through three or four feet of water to reach his lady love, as told by a well-known resident of Sherman Twp.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 25, 2010

JAN. 24, 1927

The top stories in the Norwalk Reflector-Herald on this date 81 years ago:

Water barrier keeps youth from sweetie

The following is the story of an unsuccessful effort of a young man to drive his car through three or four feet of water to reach his lady love, as told by a well-known resident of Sherman Twp.

A porter, living in the vicinity of Willard, had quite a thrill a few nights ago. He was joyful driving along in his Ford on the way to a lady friend living in Sherman Township. The porter intended to take his friend to a party. The roads were icy and in places there were deep snow drifts. But nevertheless, he was getting along very nicely and had come quite close to where his girl friend lived. Coming to a little stream he found the road flooded, but he was determined that ice, snow and water would not spoil a good time for him and his friend. He kept going cautiously, the water getting deeper and deeper. His Ford was bravely fording the stream, but all at once dropped in a deep rut and stopped. The water had put the coils, spark plugs, etc. out of commission. Looking in all directions he saw nothing but darkness and water. In a few minutes he collected his thoughts and commenced to send out S.O.S. signals with his auto horn, which the water did not put out of business.

He honked and honked for a long time. Then, a farmer, living to the north across the river, heard his distress signals and at once telephoned to another farmer living much nearer to the scene where the signals came form. Several bulky fellows came to the porter's rescue only to find the water too deep for assistance. They turned back after a team of horses and sent a rugged young fellow in after the porter and his Ford. They succeeded in getting on dry land.

Old-time sailor is laid to rest at Milan today

MILAN When the body of Capt. Joseph Anderson, 95, was lowered to its final resting place in Milan cemetery this morning, one of the last tangible reminders of the days of the old "windjammer" on the lakes, will have passed.

Captain Anderson, who died Saturday night in the home of his daughter, Mrs. H.L. Seaman, was one of the few survivors of the sail-driven era of water-borne commerce.

Native of Rio de Janiero, Brazil, Captain Anderson sailed the seven seas before turning westward to the lakes. He left saltwater in 1863 and came immediately to the middle west.

Names of famous old sailing packets of the day the William Slupe, Hyphen, William Raynor, Atmosphere, Amaranth and the Golden Age now forgotten, were bywords to sailors of that earlier day. In fact these same schooners carried the name Sandusky and Erie and Huron counties to all ports where they touched. One of them, the Atmosphere, Captain Anderson commanded for the better part of 10 years. All the above named boats were built by Valentine Fries, in whose employee Captain Anderson remained for a number of years.

Relinquishing the wheel of the Atmosphere he took command of the schooner Malcolm Stalker, which he also sailed for about 10 years.

About this time witnessed the incoming of a new era that of steam, and mere specks on the distant horizon that once had grown into full-bellying sails, bringing commerce to Erie ports, were transformed into plumes of smoke.

Captain Anderson, taking leave of sail commands, took over the steamer W.L. Wetmore.

He had been retired for nearly 20 years and until a few months ago enjoyed rugged health.

County Bureau holds annual meeting

The annual organization meeting of the Huron County Farm Bureau Board of Directors was held Friday afternoon in the Farm Bureau offices. The executive committee chosen is Pres., H.W. Lawrence; Vice Pres. Frank Hopkins, Secy-Treas., Finlay Hester. Other members of the committee are: Mrs. August Boehler, George Lund, Walter White and Harry Sutherland.

The ladies chosen to serve on the Board of Directors are Mrs. August Boehler, Mrs. George Ryerson and Miss Mildred Haas.

Compiled by Andy Prutsok