Wakeman Eagles boast Redcap Charity Fund

cashby@norwalkreflector.com WAKEMAN Wakeman Eagles No. 4354 started meeting in the basement of the American Legion building on Hyde Street when the organization was chartered in 1995. In April 1999, the Eagles moved to the corner of Ohio 60 and U.S. 20. "We built a brand new building," recalled member James Morman, who was the chaplain for two years. "I moved here 10 years ago and I remember when it was built."
Cary Ashby
Jul 25, 2010

cashby@norwalkreflector.com

WAKEMAN Wakeman Eagles No. 4354 started meeting in the basement of the American Legion building on Hyde Street when the organization was chartered in 1995.

In April 1999, the Eagles moved to the corner of Ohio 60 and U.S. 20.

"We built a brand new building," recalled member James Morman, who was the chaplain for two years. "I moved here 10 years ago and I remember when it was built."

The Wakeman Eagles Club is known for its generosity. The non-profit organization started the Redcap Charity Fund at the end of 2003.

Morman, a current trustee and past president for the foundation, said the "bulk of the donations" come from gambling receipts for the Eagles, which is then distributed to other organizations.

"The Wakeman Eagles No. 4354 Redcap Charity Fund has been helping area charities, schools and public safety departments for the last four years. Hundreds of thousands of dollars have been raised by our aerie for distribution by the charity fund," Morman said. "It's a separate entity from the actual club."

The fund has donated to Citizens Ambulance, the Wakeman Police Department and Western Reserve Local Schools. In 2007, the foundation bought a portable radio for the Townsend Township Volunteer Fire Department.

The police department has received computers, safety equipment and money for training. Chief Tim Hunker estimated his department has received at least $20,000 total in donations over the last four years.

"We're very appreciative of the Eagles and their donations," he said. "They've done really well for us."

The Wakeman Eagles hosts an annual firearm raffle.

"That draws a pretty good crowd. That's open to the public," Morman said.

The organization also has hosted the Wakeman Homecoming Firefighters Festival, which takes place at the Eagles' building at 35 E. Main St.

"That's been going on for a long time," Morman said, adding that the homecoming later was combined with the firefighters festival.

The club has between 800 and 900 members, including the women in the auxiliary.

Comments

Sweep it under ...

I think it is ethically wrong that the police department would accept money from an establisment that sells liquor. They used to police State Route 60 N. until the Eagles started giving them donations, now surprisingly enough they don't patrol that area any more. hmm !!!! That is about a blantant conflict of interest possible !!!!