Norwalk man guilty of burglary

Suspect found highly intoxicated and wearing victim's baseball hat after entering stranger's residence.
Cary Ashby
Nov 19, 2013

 

A Norwalk man who was highly intoxicated and wearing the burglary victim's baseball hat when he was arrested has pleaded guilty to an amended charge.

Jorden A. Santiago, 22, of 165 Concord Court, was convicted Monday of an amended charge of burglary. As part of a plea deal, prosecutors agreed to drop the charge from a second-degree felony to a third-degree one, making it punishable by nine months to three years in prison.

Before Santiago entered his guilty plea, Huron County Public Defender David Longo told the court his client "has no reason to dispute" the facts of the case because his BAC tested at .209 "at the jail a couple hours after he was arrested." The legal limit in Ohio is .08. It's unknown what Santiago's BAC results were when he was tested at the Norwalk police station.

"It's a blur. He doesn't remember (what happened)," Longo told Huron County Common Pleas Judge Jim Conway.

Santiago's conviction is for an Aug. 29 incident. The Summit Street resident reported the theft of an electric carving knife, a baseball cap and other items.

Police said the victim woke up about 7 a.m. to find Santiago standing at the threshold of her bedroom door.

"(Officers) eventually were able to chase him down," Huron County Prosecutor Russell Leffler said last month. "The family believes he had been in the residence earlier and stole some change."

Santiago, who was arrested shortly after the burglary, was wearing the cap the victim reported missing, assistant Prosecutor Richard Woodruff said at Monday's hearing.

The defendant, who has been unable to post 10 percent of a $7,500 bond, will be sentenced Jan. 9.

Comments

swiss family

Shia??? is that you????

JACKEL

I wonder if he would have been sober enough to recognize the red dot on his chest ?

Everyone is fam...

An electric carving knife? I didn't realize people still owned those, nor did I realize they were such a hot commodity.