VIDEO - Huron County residents digging out after snow storm

The aftereffects of a winter snow storm that hit the Firelands during the weekend has forced districts to close or delay the start of school today. After first opting for delay, the following districts decided to close school today: Norwalk's public and parochial schools, Bellevue, Christie Lane School and Workshop, Monroeville public and parochial, New London, South Central, Western Reserve and Willard public and parochial. South Central also canceled its choir concert planned for today.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 25, 2010

 

The aftereffects of a winter snow storm that hit the Firelands during the weekend has forced districts to close or delay the start of school today.

After first opting for delay, the following districts decided to close school today: Norwalk’s public and parochial schools, Bellevue, Christie Lane School and Workshop, Monroeville public and parochial, New London, South Central, Western Reserve and Willard public and parochial. South Central also canceled its choir concert planned for today.

Schools that opened after a two-hour delay today included Berlin-Milan, Plymouth-Shiloh, and Pioneer Career and Technology Center.

The winter storm system blamed for three deaths in the Midwest and Great Lakes regions spread a hazardous mix of snow, sleet and freezing rain through Ohio on Sunday.

Northeast Ohio was under a winter storm warning until about 10 p.m. on Sunday. Most of northern Ohio remained under a wind advisory until this morning, with gusts as strong as 40 mph and blowing snow  reducing visibility for drivers near Lake Erie, the National Weather Service said.

Temperatures in northeast Ohio dropped from 37 degrees at 6 a.m. to 27 degrees by mid-afternoon. Almost 5 inches of snow fell between noon and 4 p.m. at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, where about 40 percent of flights were canceled as snow squalls at times pushed visibility to nearly zero, airport commissioner Fred Szabo said.

“It’s been quite a day today, even with all the high-speed snow removal equipment and manpower we have,” he said. “As soon as you finish clearing a runway, it starts to get contaminated again.”

The National Weather Service predicted 6 to 8 inches by the time the snow tapered off today.

About 70 road crews were working 12-hour shifts for the Ohio Department of Transportation to plow highways across the region.