UPDATE - Norwalk hunter recovers from stab wounds

Stabbing victim Chad Rothgeb said this morning he isn't "in too much pain." "They're telling me I might be released today," the 22-year-old Norwalk man said by telephone from St. Vincent Mercy Medical Center.
Cary Ashby
Jul 25, 2010

Stabbing victim Chad Rothgeb said this morning he isn't "in too much pain."

"They're telling me I might be released today," the 22-year-old Norwalk man said by telephone from St. Vincent Mercy Medical Center.

A medical helicopter flew Rothgeb to Toledo after he was stabbed twice in the back during an altercation with a drifter Friday morning in a Berlin Township field near Ohio 61. The private property belongs to the relatives of a second victim, Mitchell Bellamy, 28, of Berlin Heights.

Rothgeb's injuries didn't require any surgery, but he said the two stab wounds resulted in two punctured lungs.

"They inserted a tube in my chest and I had to have a blood transfusion," he explained.

North Central EMS initially transported Rothgeb to Firelands Regional Medical Center in Sandusky before he was flown to Toledo. Bellamy went to Lorain Community Health Partners Hospital in Elyria and was released Friday from the emergency room.

The suspect, Tyrone P. Cash, 22, of Lorain, currently is in custody at the Erie County Jail. On Monday, Erie County Court Judge Paul Lux prohibited Cash from contacting the victims if he posts a $500,000 bond.

Cash has a preliminary hearing scheduled for Friday, but he could waive it and face being indicted. He is charged with two counts each of attempted murder, felonious assault, aggravated robbery and tampering with evidence. He also faces one charge each of theft and attempted theft.

Rothgeb and Bellamy were hunting in a deer blind, a small structure used to hide hunters, before being attacked. Rothgeb said they couldn't see to either side, but heard a noise to the right, in front of where they were.

"We thought it was deer first," he said.

The two hunters saw Cash walking and told him he must leave the private property.

"We weren't rude. We told him if you don't have permission (to be here), you have to go," Rothgeb added.

Cash "flipped out," he continued, cursed at the two hunters and started swinging his fists.

"I didn't know if he had a knife at that point," Rothgeb said. "It looked like he was punching (Bellamy)."

Rothgeb recalled dropping the single-shot gun he had with him and Cash wrapped his arms around him.

"He felt like he was punching me in the back," the victim said.

When Cash then turned around and attacked Bellamy, Rothgeb said he noticed the suspect had a fold-out knife with a blade 4 to 5 inches long. "I realized I just got stabbed," he continued.

Cash reportedly tried to pick up Rothgeb's rifle during the struggle with Bellamy. Rothgeb said he picked up the firearm to get it away from Cash and fired a single shot into the ground.

The attacker somehow managed to get the gun, pointed it at the two men and cocked it, Rothgeb said.

"It didn't fire because it was a single shot and it had already been fired," he added.

Cash then threw the weapon into the woods and ran away. Authorities later found the shotgun near Old Woman Creek, north of the incident, partially submerged in the water.

The defendant was arrested about 400 yards west of the altercation site. Frank Lopez, the manager of the nearby Old Woman Creek State Nature Reserve, has said authorities had Cash in custody "fairly quickly," near the railroad tracks bisecting Berlin Road.

Rothgeb said he and Bellamy decided not to pursue their attacker and went to the nearby Elm Street home of Bellamy's relative, who called 9-1-1.

"I realized I was hurt really bad," Rothgeb said. "We just wanted to get help at that point. ... We never met this man in our life."

Erie County Sheriff's Capt. Paul Sigsworth said Cash was walking to Toledo before the altercation "to speak to a friend there."

Investigators interviewed Cash's family "to give some insight into this incident," Sigsworth said, "but we didn't learn a whole lot new."

On Monday, detectives re-interviewed Bellamy, but Sigsworth declined to say what they learned. Detectives expect to talk to Rothgeb once he gets out of the hospital.

"There's still quite a lot to be done," Sigsworth said about the ongoing investigation.

Comments

Nonhunter (Anon...

I hope these "sportsmen" might now have some idea how the defenseless deer they shoot feel.

Deer nonhunter ...

you're a nonthinker, too. with zero, zip, nada, zilch clue, too. hook up with swiss, maybe you could have a big tea party in the woods together.

trevor mohr (An...

give cash the chair

trevor mohr (An...

there,s nothing wrong with deer hunting you non hunter,s go to the store and eat meat that is taken care of bout the same way

trevor mohr (An...

think you nonhunter,s could survive in the wilderness on your own i doubt it

Nonhunter (Anon...

You are correct in that I probably could not survive in the wilds, but then I have no plans, or business, being stranded there. Yes, the meat in the supermarket is often dirty and diseased. I don't eat that either. People are not naturally carnivorous -- when you drive down the road and see a deer, do you start salivating like a real carnivore does? That's why the cholesterol causes heart attacks. We are not meant to eat it.

justcallmemorga...

Do you think the deer all got together and paid this Cash guy to do this?? I think it's a conspiracy, yeah, that's it...I'm sure the UFO's are behind it, uh huh...oh, and the government...lol...

Dear (or deer) ...

Perhaps in protest of deer hunting you should find yourself a big buck, the one hunters wait their whole lives to see and tape yourself to him and prance through the woods refusing to remove yourself from him until all hunting and meat eating is banned. Worst case scenario would be the deer running into oncoming traffic, or a mean old hunter getting trigger happy. All in all I think the results would be favorable.

Deer Nonthinker...

ever have a deer come through your windshield and half claw you to death with their 'defenseless' razor sharp hooves? If I ever 'catch' me one, I hope his hooves are big enough to make 4 foot stools. I can see myself now, 'chasing' the poor, defenseless deer through the woods yelling " come back here, you dirty deer, you might run out into traffic and...SPLAT" You should watch a show starring Bear Grylls called Man vs. Wild. You might end up needing MORE therapy after that though...

Deer 'nonthinke...

The white-tailed deer is the most popular game animal in Ohio, frequently pursued by generations of hunters. Deer hunting contributes an estimated $266 million to the state's economy each year and helps to support thousands of jobs

Re: Nonhunter (...

Look in the mirror. Can you look yourself in the eyes? That's right, you can, you know why? It's because they are straight forward not on the sides of your head. Now open your mouth, don't say anything, just take a look. Ya' see them pointy teeth ya' got there, there called canine incisors, made for tearing meat. You my friend whether you like it or not are a predator, that's a meat eater and a hunter. Sorry about your luck there Carrot Top.

In Ohio... (Ano...

Deer hunting contributes an estimated $266 million to the state's economy each year and helps to support thousands of jobs.

pope ottomus (A...

as i stated before...thank you to all of the hunters, from all of the deer population... we appreciate you killing us, so we don't over populate.. it was only our land long before you ever showed up .. we just that you would include in your hunting, bat's and cats.... bats, for chasing people into their homes on a nice summers night, and cats, well cats just for the sport.. thats why they say ... cats, the other white meat....

to pope boniva ...

you talk in the third person as a deer. you are such a tool. Deer hunting contributes an estimated $266 million to the state's economy each year and helps to support thousands of jobs. Deer hunting contributes an estimated $266 million to the state's economy each year and helps to support thousands of jobs. Deer hunting contributes an estimated $266 million to the state's economy each year and helps to support thousands of jobs. Deer hunting contributes an estimated $266 million to the state's economy each year and helps to support thousands of jobs. Deer hunting contributes an estimated $266 million to the state's economy each year and helps to support thousands of jobs. Deer hunting contributes an estimated $266 million to the state's economy each year and helps to support thousands of jobs. GOT IT YET?????? TOOL!