Spin to Win closed, litigation remains

Spin to Win has shut down, but the city's not through with the business yet as a trial is set for Dec. 19 on 10 misdemeanor counts in Norwalk Municipal Court. The Water Street building that housed the gaming business now displays a sign for a new business, Pugh Motor Sports.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 25, 2010

 

Spin to Win has shut down, but the city's not through with the business yet as a trial is set for Dec. 19 on 10 misdemeanor counts in Norwalk Municipal Court.

The Water Street building that housed the gaming business now displays a sign for a new business, Pugh Motor Sports.

Norwalk Law Director Stuart O'Hara said today defendants David Pugh, Ed Cordle and Bonnie Cordle will be tried before Judge John Ridge. If found guilty, they could be charged $150 plus court costs for each of the minor misdemeanors.

Pugh, the owner of the now defunct business, was cited seven times. The Cordles were the business managers. Ed was cited twice and Bonnie received one citation.

The city was issuing daily citations before Pugh, the Cordles and James Loyer, the owner of the Water Street property, sued the city claiming "continuing illegal harassment."

Reese Wineman, lawyer for Spin to Win, said that lawsuit would probably not be continued since the business was shut down after Governor Ted Strickland signed a bill designed to limit payouts and strengthened the definition of "skill-based" machines as opposed to games of chance.

Norwalk officials first received a complaint about the business on Aug. 14. Zoning officer Linda Hebert determined that the business was violating city zoning ordinances limiting any business in the city to only have five coin-operated machines as long as the main purpose of the business was not the machines.

She also said neither Pugh nor Ed or Bonnie Cordle ever filled out the application form for a conditional-use permit.