How to grow tomatoes upside down

EDITOR'S NOTE: The following information was submitted by Milan resident Marge Crecelius, who first saw it in a newspaper article. She tried it, and the plant is featured as this week's Pick of the Week picture. Step 1: Using a spade bit, drill a 1-inch hole in the center of the bottom of a 5-gallon plastic bucket. Choose a light-colored bucket because dark ones heat the soil, which tomatoes don't like.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 25, 2010

EDITOR'S NOTE: The following information was submitted by Milan resident Marge Crecelius, who first saw it in a newspaper article. She tried it, and the plant is featured as this week's Pick of the Week picture.

Step 1: Using a spade bit, drill a 1-inch hole in the center of the bottom of a 5-gallon plastic bucket. Choose a light-colored bucket because dark ones heat the soil, which tomatoes don't like.

Step 2: Cut a slit a hand-size piece of cardboard from one edge to its center.

Step 3: Insert an 8-inch-tall tomato seedling into the hole in the bottom of the bucket, leaving 4 inches of stem and foliage peeking out the bottom. Slide the slit cardboard around the part of the stem inside the bucket for holding the plant in place and preventing the soil from leaking through the hole.

Step 4: Fill the bucket with quality baged garden soil, not potting soil, which holds too much water.

Step 5: Hang the bucket 6 feet off the ground in a spot where it will receive full sun.

Step 6: Feed with liquid fertilizer and repeat every three weeks because frequent watering will deplete the soil of necessary nutrients.

Step 7: Water as needed to keep soil constantly moist.