BLAST FROM THE PAST: Smallpox cases cause a craze

AUGUST 9, 1902 The top stories in The Evening-Herald on this date 105 years ago:
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 25, 2010

 

AUGUST 9, 1902

The top stories in The Evening-Herald on this date 105 years ago:

Smallpox crazy

The Chicago (Ohio) Times, edited by L.O. Simmons, formerly of this city, came out with a neighborly article in marked contrast to the feelings exhibited by the Sandusky papers. Here it is:

The people in the northern part of the county, in fact the whole northern part of the state, appear to be smallpox crazy, so to speak, all on account of the twenty five or thirty cases of the disease at Norwalk.

Monroeville, Bellevue, Sandusky, Huron, Berlin Heights, Ridgefield Township, and we understand New London, Fairfield and other townships in the eastern part of the county, have all quarantined against Norwalk.

These places have employed extra police and even went so far as to stretch ropes across the several roads to keep Norwalk people at home where they belong. Some very amusing reports are told concerning the quarantine, and to people familiar with smallpox scares, they are very interesting.

Mrs. John Parker dead

Mrs. John Parker Sr., who has been sick for about a week at her home on Summit Street, died at 11:15 this forenoon.

Mrs. Parker has been ailing for some time with heart disease and had on Wednesday of last week started for a visit out of town when she suffered an attack and returned home. Some days later it was thought she had a case of smallpox, but it has been so light that the doctors were not at all certain until Wednesday that she had the disease. Yesterday the heart trouble returned, which was really the cause of her death today.

Mrs. Parker was sixty-three years of age on the fifth of last April. She was one of Norwalk's best known and most respected ladies, and her loss is severely felt by a large circle of friends.

Just nine years ago today, her husband met death accidentally while engaged in the construction of the Glass Block, for which he had the contract.

Lombard is missing

George Lombard, agent for the Wheeling railroad at Clyde, has skipped out and his whereabouts are unknown. He left town very suddenly last Sunday and no trace of him can be found.

The auditor of the road is now in charge of the office and is conducting an investigation. He has been checking up the accounts, but has not yet completed his work. Lombard has been in the employ of the Wheeling for many years and was considered one of their most trusted employees. He has been stationed at Clyde for four or five years and was generally liked by neighbors and the patrons of the road. Lombard's family live in Clyde and his wife is in ignorance of her husband's whereabouts.

Compiled by Andy Prutsok