WEB EXCLUSIVE - Eagle Creek residents to be without water until end of month

Work on a permanent solution to the damaged waterline at Eagle Creek should begin Friday and be completed in two weeks. The city awarded a no-bid contract for up to $75,000 to R.A. Bores of Monroeville Tuesday night. The contractor will order the material today and is set to begin construction Friday, with a target completion date of June 29.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 25, 2010

Work on a permanent solution to the damaged waterline at Eagle Creek should begin Friday and be completed in two weeks.

The city awarded a no-bid contract for up to $75,000 to R.A. Bores of Monroeville Tuesday night. The contractor will order the material today and is set to begin construction Friday, with a target completion date of June 29.

The boil order, which has remained in effect for Eagle Creek residents since the line was damaged by county workers last Tuesday, will continue several days after the construction is complete so the city can test the water's bacteria level.

The county will reimburse the city for the cost of the construction because its employees broke the line while working on the Townline Road 151 bridge.

The city had originally planned to have an emergency council meeting on Saturday in order to approve the no-bid contract, with construction then to begin Monday so the residents would have drinking water "as soon as possible," said Mayor Sue Lesch. However, county engineer Joe Kovach requested the city wait and see if it could find a better price.

"We have not found better pricing in terms of getting it done quickly," Lesch said Tuesday. "It's also quite a mess out there."

Norwalk Public Works Director James Sawyer said that, despite some minor disagreements with the county, everyone has been able to work together toward a solution. Sawyer said the disagreements centered on technical issues, such as materials and the best way to proceed with the project, especially because the county will continue to work on the bridge at the same time R.A. Bores is installing the new waterline.

"It's like whenever you get two doctors together, they have two different ideas on how to proceed. But we've been meeting (with Kovach) at site continually and were able to agree to a working solution we will put into place," Sawyer said.

Both Lesch and Sawyer thanked the Eagle Creek residents for their patience. The city was able to install a temporary waterline, which provided enough water pressure to shower and do laundry, which was especially important for those having graduation parties over the weekend, such as Amy Weisenberger.

"The hardest thing is not going to the faucet or fridge for drinking water," she said. "It's just an inconvenience and you learn to get around it."

Eagle Creek resident Fred Waugh might have best summed up the attitude of those affected: "You have to roll with the punches."

Comments

Kenscars610@aol...

I understand it to be standard procedure to do a core sample before a job is started. Was one done where the problem of Eagle Creek arose? Such a simple procedure sure would have saved a lot of money on the problems you are experiencing now. And I'm sure the people who live in Eagle Creek, boiling ther water would have appreciated it.