Edison seniors reflect on high school experience

MILAN - The Edison High School senior class speakers reflected on their freshman year, recalled fond memories, addressed how they have faced struggles and looked forward to the future. Class vice president Josh Amstutz, a hurdler in track, compared the steps he has taken at Edison to "an everyday hurdle race.' He said running the hurdle was similar to "the path we make for ourselves leading up to graduation. This is where each one of us has decided what we want to make of ourselves in high school.'
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 25, 2010

MILAN — The Edison High School senior class speakers reflected on their freshman year, recalled fond memories, addressed how they have faced struggles and looked forward to the future.

Class vice president Josh Amstutz, a hurdler in track, compared the steps he has taken at Edison to “an everyday hurdle race.” He said running the hurdle was similar to “the path we make for ourselves leading up to graduation. This is where each one of us has decided what we want to make of ourselves in high school.”

Amstutz recalled being anxious as he entered high school, taking seriously the warnings of his middle school teachers who said “high school would be 100 times harder.” He soon found that teachers helped make the transition to Edison go smoothly.

“This is the feeling of security and confidence that I get right before the gun goes off to start the race,” Amstutz said.

Class speaker Madelyn Stevens used time as the theme in her speech to the 130 graduates.

“It is what made four years seem like an eternity when we first walked in the doors of Edison High School and it is what makes four years seem like the blink of an eye as we walk out for the last time. Time can slow down almost to a stopping point during 50 minutes of an impossible physics test, yet can speed up infinitely during the last moments spent with friends,” Stevens said.

Senior Lisa Elmlinger shared how Sunday’s graduation is when she is excited to start the next chapter of her life, but admitted to being nervous at the same time.

“Edison High School has provided all of us with a comfort zone and a routine,” she said.

The senior fondly recalling working with other students on projects or tests, procrastinating “up until the very night before an assignment was due” and even complaining about the infamous “Senioritis,” despite just starting high school.

“Whether we realize it or not, our experiences in high school, along with our parents, teachers and friends, have helped to mold us into the people that we are today. High school has helped to make us responsible, intelligent young adults,” Elmlinger said.

Speaker David Lux had the crowd laughing as he thanked parents and teachers, the “culprits” who were at “fault” for being able to have seniors master geography so “we can point out the state of Chicago on a map.” He first said the audience shouldn’t be crying so soon, referring to the reaction to an emotionally charged, three-song performance by the senior choir members.

Lux also honored his chemistry teacher John “Divine” Wallrabenstein, whom he credited with teaching “anything you wanted to know about chemistry or physics, or almost any other topic for that matter,” but only had one requirement: Learning to speak his unique language.

Superintendent David Snook took a much more serious approach.

He contrasted the self-pity of the people he called “the blamers” behind the Virginia Tech, Columbine and Amish school violence incidents with “the positive attitude oozing out of every one of our seniors” during the recent senior awards night. Snook noted that the class of about 130 seniors had been awarded more than $1 million in scholarship and already earned 587 college credits.