OUR VIEW: Employers must do right by troops

Marine Cpl. Todd Corbin deserves to kick back, relax, lie on a beach somewhere and enjoy life. But, unfortunately, things are never quite that simple. Corbin, whose heroic deeds in Iraq have garnered national attention, is going back for three more weeks of military training on June 9. The problem is, by Ohio law, the sheriff's office can only pay him for 176 hours of military training, which the Huron County Sheriff's deputy already has reached.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 25, 2010

Marine Cpl. Todd Corbin deserves to kick back, relax, lie on a beach somewhere and enjoy life. But, unfortunately, things are never quite that simple.

Corbin, whose heroic deeds in Iraq have garnered national attention, is going back for three more weeks of military training on June 9. The problem is, by Ohio law, the sheriff's office can only pay him for 176 hours of military training, which the Huron County Sheriff's deputy already has reached.

The sheriff has come under some public fire for the suggestion that Corbin will have to use personal or vacation time when he heads off for training, or make up the missed work on his days off. While it seems unfair that a war hero would be facing such a dilemma, on the surface at least, it appears the sheriff's hands are tied. The good news is, Corbin will be paid by the military during his training though it will be less than he would receive from the sheriff's office.

Corbin's problem outlines a major problem many Iraq veterans are facing. When National Guard or Reserve troops return, many find themselves in following situations: their civilian employers have cut staff, including their job; they were passed over for promotions; injuries they sustained prevent them from resuming their previous jobs; and/or new employers are hesitant to hire returning veterans, knowing they could, and likely will, be called back at any time.

There are, of course, laws designed to protect their jobs, but many veterans are forced to file complaints with the Labor Department and fight for those rights. And, a third of the cases are never even heard, because the Guard or Reserve member is recalled to active duty.

Fortunately, Corbin's situation has a chance to work out, if not for the best, than at least in a way that allows him to keep his vacation time. And Corbin, as well as all the brave men and women serving in our armed forces, have certainly earned a vacation.

Comments

once more your ...

Please find out your facts. By law he has to be paid while on military leave. dont spit false facts out and represent them to be true. There are some people who dont yet know that your paper doesn't know what its talking about.

Reflector Staff...

According to the Ohio Revised Code section 5923.05, public employees are entitled to 176 hours (1 month) of paid leave. Beyond that, he gets a stipend of the difference between his military pay and his regular pay, up to $500. The story "Marine, wife meet president," does indicate that Corbin will be paid, but he will get less. We try very hard to make sure everything we print is accurate. Obviously, no one is perfect. So if anyone does see anything that they don't think is correct, please let us know, and we'll do everything we can to set the record straight.

smalltowner (An...

I would like to bring another subject up. While we in Huron County have two Hometown Heros why have their individual Home towns done nothing to honor them. There was nothing done by the town of Willard for Todd Corbin who was awarded the Navy Cross and there was nothing done by Monroeville for Jeff Schuller who was awarded a Silver Star. Both these young men deserve some recognition for these Honors it seems the people of Cleveland care more about them than the people right here at home. What a shame. I remember reading about these two last July when they received their awards and were honored at a Indians Game. Then there was nothing until this past week when the issue of pay for Todd was brought to light. Oh well, I guess maybe I was raised differently, where I grew up if you did something that brought honor to your community,the community would do something to honor you . My how times have changed.