BLAST FROM THE PAST - Vagrant's body discovered

APRIL 11, 1927 The top stories in the Norwalk Reflector-Herald on this date 80 years ago:
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 24, 2010

APRIL 11, 1927

The top stories in the Norwalk Reflector-Herald on this date 80 years ago:

Unknown man is found dead

On Sunday, the body of an unknown man was found on the Rose farm just east of Hartland, about a half a mile north of the W&LE track. The body was found by Edgar Pierce, a farmer, face downward and submerged in a small creek.

Nothing was about the body that would lead to identification. The man was about five feet, and six or seven inches in height, of stout build, had light hair and wore working clothes.

The body was brought to Hay's undertaking establishment. On the body were found three handkerchiefs, a towel, a comb and some beef steak. This leads authorities to believe that the man was a vagrant. Sheriff Trimmer and undertaker Hay took charge of the body.

John Kendall, cavalry veteran, answers taps

John Kendall, a Civil War veteran, died Saturday morning at Memorial Hospital. A life resident of Peru Twp., he was born May 23, 1847; enlisted in 3rd O Calvary in 1864 and was admitted to the Soldier's Home Sept. 21, 1923 and discharged last January.

He made his home with his nephew Amos Eastman and is survived by one sister, Mrs. John K. Ryerson of Norwalk; three nephews, Guerie Eastman, Peru; John K. Ryerson, Norwalk; Amos Eastman of Peru; and three nieces, Mrs. Jessie Kimball; Mrs. Henry Sulser of Martel and Mrs. Effie Parker.

Authorities start war on violators of traffic laws

Norwalk police have started a campaign to curb speeding here. Within the last few days, two young men have been fined here and have had their licenses taken away by Mayor Smith after being charged with fast or reckless driving. A traveling man alleged to have been found drunk in a car near Halfway Road on the Monroeville Road was fined $50 and costs by Probate Judge Bechtol.

Golf club to dispense with the pro

The spirit of economy which has prevailed over the Norwalk Country Club the past season found full fruition when the board of governors this week decided to get along on the golf course this summer minus the services of a pro. The pro or professional is an expert golfer who is supposed to teach the ancient game at so much per teach and to keep clubs, etc. in good order and to handle the balls and caddies and usually costs a considerable sum. The golfers of the club co-operating in the spirit of thrift, have decided to forego this almost necessary adjunct for this year till the club gets financially on its feet. The outlook for an excellent year never was brighter, from clubhouse to 9th green, and the new roadway connecting the club with town will be completed in a few days.

Compiled by Andy Prutsok