Roast and Toast

Toast Norwalk's Main Street School for being recognized by the Ohio Middle School Association for its use of teaming as a teaching technique. One of only eight schools to receive the award, Main Street divides each grade into teams and two or three teachers focus on that team. The teachers then meet and plan lessons, events and ways teams can compete against each other. While the school is clearly on the right path, the best part of the award might be that the school continues to amass ideas, receiving a good suggestion from a pair of principals who visited the school as part of the award process. Roast Gov. Ted Strickland's plan to build the school construction budget around a $5 billion lump sum payment from the tobacco industry. Ohio, which is due $18 billion over the next 40 years, would be the 19th state to take the lump sum payment. The money is needed to replace a projected $40 million decline in tax revenues and pay for school construction projects the state already has agreed to fund. While the lump sum option might be tempting in the short term, state officials need to think about what's best for Ohio in the long term. Because selling Ohio $13 billion short and using the money not for its intended purposes public health and anti-smoking programs is certainly short-sighted.
Norwalk Reflector Staff
Jul 24, 2010

 

Toast Norwalk's Main Street School for being recognized by the Ohio Middle School Association for its use of teaming as a teaching technique. One of only eight schools to receive the award, Main Street divides each grade into teams and two or three teachers focus on that team. The teachers then meet and plan lessons, events and ways teams can compete against each other. While the school is clearly on the right path, the best part of the award might be that the school continues to amass ideas, receiving a good suggestion from a pair of principals who visited the school as part of the award process.

Roast Gov. Ted Strickland's plan to build the school construction budget around a $5 billion lump sum payment from the tobacco industry. Ohio, which is due $18 billion over the next 40 years, would be the 19th state to take the lump sum payment. The money is needed to replace a projected $40 million decline in tax revenues and pay for school construction projects the state already has agreed to fund. While the lump sum option might be tempting in the short term, state officials need to think about what's best for Ohio in the long term. Because selling Ohio $13 billion short and using the money not for its intended purposes public health and anti-smoking programs is certainly short-sighted.

Toast the Norwalk Park and Recreation Department for starting Norwalk's own "Biggest Losers Challenge." The competition has driven area residents to get healthier and work hard the 127 participants have lost more than 1,500 pounds since the contest began in January. No matter the motivation, the department and those taking the initiative should be commended.

Roast Cincinnati resident Maria Daniels for not only stealing from the Cincinnati Public Library, but using her children to help her. Daniels was arrested last week and found with more than 90 library DVDs worth $2,000. It's been a rough few months for the Ohio library, which has had more than 800 DVDs worth about $16,000 stolen between July and December. Ohio has some of the best libraries in the country, and they deserve to be treated with more respect than that.