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Some Super Bowl ads score, some fumble

Wire • Feb 4, 2013 at 11:07 PM

When it comes to telling a good story about a brand, Volkswagen and Best Buy had the most effective ads so far this Super Bowl, experts said — but that quirky one with security footage of people being, gasp, nice to others was the runaway heartstrings tugger.

“The Volkswagen ad says, ‘When things are built right, you have no need to worry,’” said Small Army CEO Jeff Freedman, about the controversial commercial that features buttoned-down office workers who start speaking like Rastafarians after cruising in a VW.

Freedman also applauded a cute Best Buy ad, featuring Burlington-bred comedian Amy Poehler as a baffled but determined shopper.

“It worked because it said, ‘Best Buy is there for the answers you need,’ ” he said.

But Melissa Lea, president of Blitz Media, a full-service media agency, said her Super Bowl favorite was Coca Cola’s “Security” ad, which shows security camera footage of people being really, really nice to each other.

“With everything that’s going on now, the security and watching people and the lack of privacy, it managed to capture the good in all that, as opposed to the evil,” she said.

Freedman gave the thumbs-down to GoDaddy, the website creator that has spent nearly $8 million on ads before halftime.

The company always aims to shock with its ads.

This year, it was more of the same, with gorgeous supermodel Bar Refaeli making out with a nerd to make a point about the company’s desire to be both smart and sexy. “If I am going to have my website built,” Freedman said, “I’m going somewhere competent, and I’m not getting competent from GoDaddy.”

Freedman also said the Hyundai ads — he had counted five so far — didn’t work so well, either.

“They were entertaining, but they didn’t tell me anything new,” he said.

Dennis Franczak, CEO at Boston-based FUSEideas, said, “The Hyundai spot with the kids was hilarious, and you could really get the message, that Hyundai is a lifestyle vehicle.”

Franczak also liked the Audi’s “Brace” ad about a young man going to his prom on his own.

“It was funny, but it also delivered the message that you are a little empowered when you drive an Audi,” he said.

But Franczak said the Jeep ad was the “universal dud” in his home: “You could totally tell they were trying to put the Jeep as the hero, not the troops, so it felt really insincere.”

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Christine McConville - Boston Herald (MCT)©2013 the Boston Herald

Visit the Boston Herald at www.bostonherald.com

Distributed by MCT Information Services

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