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West Side Sunoco checks in 15 deer Monday

Cary Ashby • Nov 27, 2017 at 6:00 PM

Heather Nickoli saw the first influx of deer to be checked in about 9 a.m. Monday — the first day of the deer-gun hunting season.

Until about 1 p.m., the assistant manager at West Side Sunoco checked in about 15 deer. Six of those were bucks.

“Today (Monday) was mostly doe,” said Nickoli, the assistant manager for the last four years. “Most of them were small. The racks were kinda small.”

On Monday, the deer had four to eight points. 

“Last year I had quite a few eight points,” Nickoli said. “They only count them if they are over an inch (long). If they don’t have any points over an inch they are called button bucks.”

Hunting remains the most effective management tool for maintaining Ohio’s healthy deer population, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR).

From Monday to Sunday and again Dec. 16 and 17, during the deer-gun seasons, deer can be hunted with a shotgun, a muzzleloader .38 caliber or larger, a handgun .357 caliber or larger, straight-walled cartridge rifles .357 to .50 caliber, or bows, according to the ODNR Division of Wildlife.

“A lot of the bucks were hit by bows (Monday),” Nickoli said. “They say there are big ones out there.”

Most the hunters checking in at West Side Sunoco were from Norwalk, Monroeville or Willard.

“I had a few from Sandusky. (One hunter’s) dad owned property in Norwalk,” Nickoli said.

When asked about the estimated age range of Monday’s hunters, she said they were from 16 years old to “a guy born in 1940.”

Deer bag limits are determined by county and a hunter can’t exceed a county bag limit, according to the ODNR Division of Wildlife. In Huron County, Nickoli said hunters are allowed three deer per season and only one of those can be a buck.

“Adults will let a doe go. They are trying to get their buck first if they can,” she added.

The statewide bag limit is six deer. Hunters may harvest only one buck in Ohio, regardless of the hunting method or location. Hunting hours for all deer seasons are 30 minutes before sunrise to 30 minutes after sunset.

Hunting has a more than $853 million economic impact in Ohio through the sale of equipment, fuel, food, lodging and more, according to the National Shooting Sports Foundation’s “Hunting in America: An Economic Force for Conservation” publication.

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